1. 10,000 members - Guess the Day and Hour and win!
    CLICK HERE!
    (if you are logged in, this notice can be dismissed using the "x" to the top right of the notice)

  2. Official BYH caption Contest #2 - 29 July 2014 - Pic by Pioneer Chicken
    Click HERE!
    (if you are logged in, this notice can be dismissed using the "x" to the top right of the notice)

  3. BYH Featured Thread: Keeping coyotes away....?
    CLICK HERE!
    (if you are logged in, this notice can be dismissed using the "x" to the top right of the notice)

  4. BYH Picture of the Week (POW) - Submit your Pics Now !!
    Click HERE!
    (if you are logged in, this notice can be dismissed using the "x" to the top right of the notice)

  5. Caption Contest Submissions - Pictures Needed
    Click HERE!
    (if you are logged in, this notice can be dismissed using the "x" to the top right of the notice)

Can you make money raising rabbits?

Discussion in 'Everything Else Rabbits' started by theawesomefowl, Dec 30, 2010.

  1. Dec 30, 2010
    theawesomefowl

    theawesomefowl Ridin' The Range

    Joined:
    Nov 19, 2010
    Messages:
    436
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    64
    Location:
    New York
    Okay, I don't like rabbits very much, and am somewhat allergic to the fluffy Angora bunnies. But I know they are good livestock and would consider raising a few if it was profitable. And I am sure I would learn to like them if I kept some. :rolleyes:
    So go on. Convince me to get rabbits! I probably won't but why would i?
    Thanks! :) p.s. I would not be interested in showing as I much prefer poultry in that respect.
  2. Dec 30, 2010
    tortoise

    tortoise Ridin' The Range

    Joined:
    Dec 17, 2010
    Messages:
    233
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    58
    EVERYONE I talked to said rabbits is a money-loosing hobby. This coming from a lady with hundreds of rabbits, spending $20K/year on shows. I did and still do think she is crazy. :)

    I have angoras. You *can* sell wool, but it is very hard to find a market for it. I find it to be a good bartering item, tough to sell. However, if you happen to spin, angora blend yarns can sell for a premium.

    If you can get into a 4H/ARBA show market, show buns are easy to sell. I sell a few rabbits for $80+, I'm trying to breed a certain color that will sell at $150+ each. If you can get a reputation for good temperament rabbits, you can sell pets at a premium.

    Selling to the dog food market can be profitable at $4/lb. There is one place that did this that just about put themselves out of business because they couldn't keep up with demand. I initially raised mine for dog food.

    Of course, you can butcher them to lower your food bill. Does make money, but saves it from your grocery bill.

    I think the secret to rabbits it to start small. Only add cages as you sell rabbits. MAKE them pay for themselves.

    Look for a breed that isn't the most popular in your area. I am literally hours away from any other breeder with my breed. That gives me a huge market. Lionhead rabbits are popular, but they only fetch $5 - $15 in the pet market. ... Mine sell at $60 for the pet market.

    Rabbit breeders are in the dark ages with internet. I've made most of my sales with cute fluffy bunny photos on a free site. It's so easy. I sit around with fluffy bunnies. If they sell, I get money. If they don't sell, I get dinner.

    If you are clever, yes, you can make a little money off of them. But it won't come easy or automatically.
  3. Dec 31, 2010
    theawesomefowl

    theawesomefowl Ridin' The Range

    Joined:
    Nov 19, 2010
    Messages:
    436
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    64
    Location:
    New York
    Oh. Than I'm not sure about them....what about raising them for meat and selling them?
    Do you have to show them to sell Pet rabbits? Thanks again!
  4. Dec 31, 2010
    theawesomefowl

    theawesomefowl Ridin' The Range

    Joined:
    Nov 19, 2010
    Messages:
    436
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    64
    Location:
    New York
    tortoise, your bunnies are cute! Nice blog too!
    But those dust-bunnies would make me sneeze myself into oblivion..... :lol
    I had a really bad reaction after handling some English angoras last summer.

    I sort of like the looks of Lops, but should make sure I'm not too allergic to what ever breed before I get them IF IF IF I get them!
  5. Dec 31, 2010
    Bunnylady

    Bunnylady Loving the herd life

    Joined:
    Nov 27, 2009
    Messages:
    719
    Likes Received:
    16
    Trophy Points:
    101
    Location:
    Wilmington, NC
    Not meanin' to be mean, but this is an excellent reason for you not to get into rabbits. If you don't really like your animals, it is unlikely that you will want to put up with the scratches that inevitably come with handling them, or the rabbit fur that seems to get on everything! The allergy thing -well, lets just say that I know a number of rabbit people that are allergic to rabbits (including a rabbit show judge!), they all find the Angoras to be the most problematic, and somehow manage to deal with it.

    My husband is convinced that nobody makes money with rabbits, and I have to admit, I don't try very hard. Something that a lot of people overlook, is the time that is involved in caring for the animals. There are things you can do to minimize the actual hours spent, but your time has to count for something. Most rabbit people do it because they simply enjoy it, so they don't care how much time they spend! I'm sorry, but I think anyone that goes into breeding anything with profit being the main motive is going into it for the wrong reason. Heaven knows, the frustrations and failures that always come with a breeding operation are tough enough to take when you are just doing it for "fun!"

    Rabbit personalities can run the full gamut from friendly to downright vicious. If you choose your breeding stock carefully, you may be able to avoid turning out really nasty-tempered animals, but "friendly" only comes with handling (and that, of course, comes back to time spent with the animals).

    If you just want to turn out pets, there is no need to go to shows. But if you care whether you are getting your chosen breed "right," there is no better way than putting your animals on a show table and having them judged against whatever else is out there. Rabbit people are generally a very cheerful, chatty bunch, always willing to "talk rabbit;" some will turn up at a show without entering a single animal, just for the fun of being there with their rabbit-raising friends! They also are notorious for suffering from "hutch blindness," so you really need to know what you are looking at - the rabbit's owner may not!
  6. Dec 31, 2010
    ksalvagno

    ksalvagno Alpaca Master

    Joined:
    Jun 1, 2009
    Messages:
    7,897
    Likes Received:
    32
    Trophy Points:
    253
    Location:
    North Central Ohio
    I would say if you don't care for rabbits, then don't do them. All animals are a lot of work and you better like them with all the care that they need. And this is any animal, not just rabbits. To make money in any animal business, you have to put A LOT of time and effort along with money into it. Marketing your farm and selling takes just as much of your time as does caring for them. It is not for the faint hearted or for people just interested in the money end. Not trying to be mean here, this is coming from someone who has been in alpacas for 13.5 years and goats for 1.5 years full time and the majority of my day is spent caring for animals and at night working the marketing end of it.
  7. Dec 31, 2010
    tortoise

    tortoise Ridin' The Range

    Joined:
    Dec 17, 2010
    Messages:
    233
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    58
    Angora are worse for allergies because the hair traps so much dander (people are allergic to dander, not hair). If I blow out one of my rabbits, the entire room is COVERED in fine white dust (dander). I do it in the bathroom with the exhaust fan on and the fan grill is completely covered with a thick layer of dander. :sick

    A short, less dense hair would not trap so much dander, but it would still be there.

    Bunnylady makes good points. I don't count my time into costs because 1) I'm home anyways and 2) I like them! :cool Let's say you were to pay someone to take care of the rabbits? No longer making money. (Unless you have a sweet deal like me where I trade dog training lessons for help with the rabbits and petsitting.) Also she is totally right about the scratches. Rabbits can do some serious damage - especially for someone who is new to handling them. It you don't like them, you're either 1) Not going to handle them and they're behavior will get worse, or 2) Going to get scratched up and quit rabbits altogether.

    That is SO true. I was at ARBA convention this year and was going to buy a small pet rabbit for my son. (He's 3 - the 10 pound rabbits are too big for him.) I was stressing to one breeder that I needed good temperament. She had this rabbits that she thought was so sweet and wonderful. NOT. She even said it got handled for 15 minutes a day. Another breeder had a completely unhandled, unsocialized rabbit that was totally chill and calm and let my son handle her. Guess which one I bought? It's easy to get lost thinking your rabbits are the best thing ever. So make sure you know what you want and need because you can't trust the breeder.
  8. Dec 31, 2010
    Lorelai

    Lorelai Ridin' The Range

    Joined:
    Oct 20, 2010
    Messages:
    115
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    64
    Location:
    Washington
    Here are my two cents on this subject - it depends on how you define "profit." If you are looking for profit with a cash value, then I would agree, you aren't necessarily going to get ahead with rabbits, unless you find a niche and then spend a lot of time cultivating your herd to fit that niche. However, if you think of profit like being able to eat healthier meat, that costs less cash than it would if you bought comparable meat at the grocery store, then, I think, you'd profit in that way. Also, it could make a good barter item if you have a market for it - we plan on trading our excess rabbit meat for BF's family's grass-fed beef, and I can trade with my family for free range eggs. It all depends on how you calculate profit, because it does profit when you think about health (yours and your animals), self-sustainability, and gaining real respect for the food on your dinner table. As someone who has a difficult time with the cute factor associated with bunnies, these are things I have to remind myself every so often, because for us, it's worth it. Plus, it tastes better than any chicken I've every had! :p For us, raising our own meat rabbits, butchering and processing them ourselves for our own consumption... it's totally worth it. Their value is worth more this way than it could be if converted to cash, because the value of money is fickle, but we, and other people, are always going to need food. This is just how I look at it. :)
  9. Dec 31, 2010
    theawesomefowl

    theawesomefowl Ridin' The Range

    Joined:
    Nov 19, 2010
    Messages:
    436
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    64
    Location:
    New York
    Well, in that case I am happy with my poultry. Maybe I'll still attempt rabbits some day though. Thanks for posting.
  10. Jan 2, 2011
    Caprice_Acres

    Caprice_Acres Chillin' with the herd

    Joined:
    Dec 8, 2010
    Messages:
    92
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    29
    Location:
    Michigan
    Making a profit is possible with any kind of livestock - but you must have a demand, a steady market, and be profit oriented.

    As a HOBBY, animals in generall are NOT profit making. As a BUSINESS they can be.

Share This Page