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Fenceing Tips and Tricks

Discussion in 'Fencing, Housing, Manure Management' started by robren, Jan 3, 2013.

  1. Jan 3, 2013
    robren

    robren Exploring the pasture

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    I will be installing new fence in the spring so I am gathering info now. The area to be fenced will be approx 200ft x 150ft. Fence type will be split rail ( 3 rails)along my driveway and along the woodline, 2 by 4 rolled fence 48inch high on T posts. Is there a trick to getting the posts straight and all the same height on the split rail?? Concerning the rolled fence, what is the best way to get good tension between the T posts. I'm thinking the 300ft roll is going to be awkward to handle, I'll probably be working alone. Any tricks to holding the tension on the roll of wire while it's being attached to the T posts. Thanks for your thoughts.:)
  2. Jan 3, 2013
    SheepGirl

    SheepGirl Master of Sheep Golden Herd Member

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    We put up a woven wire fence this past August, except we used all wooden posts. We used a post pounder for the posts, and we would use a level to make sure it was straight. All posts are at random heights; we still need to take a chainsaw to the top to make them all even.

    But for putting the woven wire on, what we did is we attached it to the first post by wrapping it and stapling it on, and then we rolled out the wire about 50' or so and we just picked it up and walked it towards the posts. Because you're the only person, you will probably have to go post by post making it tight. At first what we did is I would hand tighten every post or every other post with a hammer (put the claw part of the hammer on a knot and just pull back against the post) and then my cousin would staple the fence. We went all the way up the post. We finished the first roll and then my uncle brought out his fence stretcher thing and then it was able to be tightened across six or so posts and then my cousins and brothers and I each stapled a post so we got 6 posts done in the time it would take to do 1-2.

    Here's pictures of how we did ours: http://www.backyardherds.com/forum/viewtopic.php?pid=265047#p265047

    Good luck and we love pictures here at BYH!
  3. Jan 9, 2013
    Lupa Duende

    Lupa Duende Chillin' with the herd

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    we have fenced in four acres for the children and animals to 'free-range'. my husband and i pounded cedar posts in (betweem rocks) at six foot intervals.
    use a post-hole digger is you can access a tractor we could not and cursed a bit too much.
    we unrolled cattle fencing (woven wire from Tractor Supply) and filled in the bottom with wood chips, logs, rocks to keep the kids (baby goats) from leaping into a coyote's kitchen.

    i keep the outside of the fenced area free of raspberry and bramble patches and mow/trim as much as possible.
    good luck.
  4. Jan 10, 2013
    gruberguy

    gruberguy Exploring the pasture

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    For the rolled fence.... We staple it to the post at your starting point... Unroll the whole thing to the end... Nail together 2 2x4's or 2 2x6's (cut to 48" tall) with the fence inbetween the boards. Then attach chain or strapping to bottom and top of board. Attach come -a- long or fence puller to the chain in the middle, and tighten. The purpose of the boards is to not stretch a huge hole in your fence. Purpose of the chain/strapping is to make sure you pull it evenly. SOmetimes you might have to move your comealong up or down on your chain if the fence gets too tight on top or bottom....
  5. Jan 18, 2013
    amenfarm

    amenfarm Just born

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    I agree with gruberguy--My husband also uses a come-along for rolled fencing and pounds the t-posts into the ground 2 feet. He also took a piece of 4 foot metal and welded on hooks every few inches so he can hold the fence evenly with the com-along. Fences come out even and tight. If the ground is Very hard you can soak the area the night before with the garden hose or a few buckets of water, my husband has even kept a fire going and heated the ends of the t-posts if the ground is quite hard--we have clay.
  6. Jan 20, 2013
    goatboy1973

    goatboy1973 Loving the herd life

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    Robren, I use either a tractor, ATV, or my pickup to add tension along with a come along.
  7. Jan 25, 2013
    bm12171

    bm12171 Exploring the pasture

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    We have clay too amenfarm, so I'll have to tell my hubby how you handled putting the posts in; that may be some benefit when we try to put our fence in here in a couple months. Great advice with the 2x4s too- I know my hubby has used a come-a-long on the chain link we put up, but makes sense having the 2x4s attached to the fencing. I better bookmark this so i can just show him. Thanks for the post Robren, cause this may help us alot when putting ours up! Everyone on byh is great; lots of great info and wonderful people!
  8. Jan 26, 2013
    robren

    robren Exploring the pasture

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    Thanks everyone for the suggestions!!! Sheepgirls post and link was very helpful. It must be nice to have a large and helpful family living nearby. Also the tip about the 2x4s was awesome. You can definately hold good tension on the fence from top to bottom with that set up.
    I do have a small tractor (JD 2210 / 20horse?) but I DO NOT have a post hole digger. A suggestion from the man building the barn for me... Start small, you don't have to do all the fencing at once, you'll get overwhelmed!!! Now why didn't I think of that?

    So now I'm thinking of just a small paddock area for now. Any suggestions on it's size. For now I will be having only 2 horses.

    Thanks again for your ideas:)

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