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Horrible Hooves

Discussion in 'Everything Else Horses, Mules & Donkeys' started by Stacykins, Aug 21, 2012.

  1. Aug 21, 2012
    Stacykins

    Stacykins Ridin' The Range

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    What would you do/say if you saw an animal whose hooves looked like this:

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    And it was at a place open to the public, such as a fair or zoo?

    I may not be an expert in equids, but the hooves of this donkey/zebra mix were all incredibly overgrown and in need of some real care. The animal was not standing normally because of the hooves.

    These pictures were taken yesterday, by the way.
  2. Aug 21, 2012
    secuono

    secuono Loving the herd life

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    Animal control or contact the zoo owners.
  3. Aug 21, 2012
    goodhors

    goodhors Overrun with beasties

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    Animal may not be able to be handled for trimming. Some can't tolerate
    the drugs, may not be able to find anyone willing to trim them!! I know
    our local Farrier wouldn't touch a Zebra or Zebra-cross. May not be
    the owner's fault he can't get hoof care done on this animal.

    Zebras are regarded as among the MOST dangerous of Zoo animals,
    can be exceedingly difficult to manage. The most serious warning code
    is put out if one escapes at the zoos, same as a loose Tiger! I have seen
    some nasty Zebra-cross animals that were dangerous to handle. I sure
    wouldn't touch one myself.

    Of course people "all know" specific animals that were Zebra or Zebra-crosses
    who were not difficult. But each is an individual, so don't think
    because one person could handle their animal, that ALL of them can
    be handled like a pony or horse can. And some who have been gentle,
    will suddenly turn on their handler and attack them. The wild part
    takes over for whatever reason, making them unexpectedly dangerous.

    Kind of like those various Apes, chimps, who suddenly attack for no
    known reason, have never been badly behaved before. They are
    wild animals, you never tame them 100%, so you NEVER let your
    guard down when working with them.
  4. Aug 21, 2012
    Straw Hat Kikos

    Straw Hat Kikos The Kiko Cowboy

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    I agree. Nobody knows the situation and nobody should pretend to. If you feel so strongly about it then contact the zoo owner and just talk to them. Don't be the crazy person who yells and threatens, just talk. It sickens me that we have to call Animal Control and be sure to do this or that. You have no idea! It is really none of our business. People are to trigger happy these days.

    I do want to say that I am not putting this one one person or saying this to anybody on here. Just my thought on how this are handled these days.
  5. Aug 22, 2012
    redtailgal

    redtailgal New Member

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    Those hooves are horribly overgrown and have to be uncomfortable, possibly painful for that animal.

    That said, there is no way of knowing the situation behind it. I've seen horses get really bad because they have reputation and no farrier will work with them. I know of a horse right now that has to be heavily sedated for a trim, and does not do well with the meds, so the trims are not very often. In that case, it's actually healthier for the animal to have such sorry looking feet.

    If I had been in this situation, I would have taken the same pictures, then pointedly but politely shown them to the person caring for the animal and asked an "innocent question" such as "Poor lil guy, isnt there anything that can be done for his feet?". Be careful not to let your emotions take control.....take a breath and LISTEN to what the caregiver is saying. Then, no matter what the response was, I would smile and walk away. If the response was one of negligence or ignorance, I would be on my cell phone calling animal protection before I drew another breath.

    I would strive to be as dignified as possible in dealing with anyone. I've seen folks try to help a critter in need by ranting, raving, screaming, being underhanded etc etc. They just dont get as much done. I'd present my case to everyone I needed to, but I'd do it calmly, with education and a smile.

    I am a HUGE advocate for standing up for someone/some critter in need, and a HUGE advocate for doing the right thing. But, you will definately get more done if the judgement call you make is a thoroughly educated one. Give them a chance, and listen to what they are saying, even if you dont like what they are saying.
  6. Aug 22, 2012
    Stacykins

    Stacykins Ridin' The Range

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    Yea, because I didn't know the situation, I didn't want to make a fuss while there, I just took the pictures (I also took a full body shot of the animal in question). I knew people here, who know more about equids that I do, would know the best way to calmly approach the subject. You guys are right that ranting or being nasty about it does more harm than good. And you could be very right that the animal cannot be seen by a farrier. I hope to learn more about the situation, so I will be asking once I can think of how to best do it.

    The zonkey is part of a 'petting zoo' part exhibit. Not one where you can go in with the animals. But rather they can approach you at the fence if they choose to do so.
  7. Aug 22, 2012
    bonbean01

    bonbean01 True BYH Addict

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    Straw's post reminded me back to many years ago when I was still living in Canada...the SPCA left a threatening note in my mailbox about the condition of my Arab mare being too skinny with a very rough coat. I phoned them and asked them to please come out as I had something to show them. My Dad had purchased this mare for me since the owner hadn't been able to feed it much more than sawdust through the winter and my Dad knew I'd bust my butt getting her back in shape.

    So...three women come out and I show them the photos of the mare when I got her...they were horrified...and so glad she was looking as good as she was now. Goes to show, you never really know a situation without asking.

    Sometimes an animal that low won't come back...but in this case she did...turned out to be a beauty and a joy to ride...I love happy endings :)
  8. Aug 22, 2012
    Straw Hat Kikos

    Straw Hat Kikos The Kiko Cowboy

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    That's an awesome story. Stuff like this happens all to often and good people like you help to turn it around. It really great.

    I think the world would be MUCH better off without the SPCA and related organizations.
  9. Aug 22, 2012
    Queen Mum

    Queen Mum N.E.R.D.

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    I respectfully disagree. It is never healthier for the animal to have bad feet. Yes some animals are dangerous. And some are harder to work with and some don't tolerate sedation, but if you know that then they should be cared for differently. There is a solution in all cases. It is our responsibility as captors to find what works and do it. Period. We don't leave the animal uncared for because we haven't found the solution.
  10. Aug 22, 2012
    currycomb

    currycomb Overrun with beasties

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    as a public zoo, they should have facilities to care for feet of various animals. we adopted a 5 yr old mustang, and as much as we tried, we could not get her feet picked up, much less trimmed. i contacted the adoption place, and they agreed to trim her at their facility if i could get her there. loading in the stock trailer was no big deal for her, so off we went. they eased her into a chute, squeezed the chute, then turned her on her side. tied her feet, then used a saw and trimmed the feet. quick, efficient, and safe for all involved. so, where there is a will, there is a way. we were moving without facilities, so returned her to the BLM.

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