1. BYH Featured Thread: Winter with goats
    CLICK HERE!
    (if you are logged in, this notice can be dismissed using the "x" to the top right of the notice)

  2. BYH Picture Contest - Fall 2014
    CLICK HERE!
    (if you are logged in, this notice can be dismissed using the "x" to the top right of the notice)

  3. BYH New Section: Bees & Beekeeping
    CLICK HERE!
    (if you are logged in, this notice can be dismissed using the "x" to the top right of the notice)

  4. Official Poll: What breed of Livestock Guardian Dog do you prefer?
    CLICK HERE!
    (if you are logged in, this notice can be dismissed using the "x" to the top right of the notice)

  5. Official BYH Caption Contest #4 - Pic by Pioneer Chicken
    CLICK HERE!
    (if you are logged in, this notice can be dismissed using the "x" to the top right of the notice)

  6. BYH Picture of the Week (POW) - Submit your Pics Now !!
    Click HERE!
    (if you are logged in, this notice can be dismissed using the "x" to the top right of the notice)

How much do I feed my Nigerian Dwarf Goats? **New Pics***

Discussion in 'Everything Else Goats' started by Melissa'sDreamFarm, Nov 9, 2010.

  1. Nov 9, 2010
    Melissa'sDreamFarm

    Melissa'sDreamFarm Ridin' The Range

    Joined:
    Sep 9, 2010
    Messages:
    266
    Likes Received:
    1
    Trophy Points:
    74
    I just got two ND does and they are 8 months old. I have been giving them 1/2 cup Goat Chow and 2 cups alfalfa pellets in the AM and PM feeding. I think it's too much, they have REALLY gotten fat since I got them. I know some is the winter coat growing in, but I'll take some pictures tonight so ya'll can see what I'm talking about.

    They have free choice hay and minerals, they do get some browse, but not so much right now as I have them penned closer to the barn. As they get used to the place, I'll let them roam out more. :D

    BTW, the person I bought them from did not have any boys, so they are not pregnant. I wanted to wait until they were a year old before I bred them, because I can't tell (being a newbie) if there body condition is considered mature enough. lol
  2. Nov 9, 2010
    ksalvagno

    ksalvagno Alpaca Master

    Joined:
    Jun 1, 2009
    Messages:
    7,897
    Likes Received:
    32
    Trophy Points:
    253
    Location:
    North Central Ohio
    Remember that grain is a supplement. If they are fat, then the hay should be good enough. I usually don't give my girls more than 1 measuring cup at a feeding unless being milked. I also don't feed my girls more than once a day unless being milked. I have had to cut back on grain as all my goats are well conditioned. :)
  3. Nov 9, 2010
    SDGsoap&dairy

    SDGsoap&dairy Loving the herd life

    Joined:
    Dec 7, 2009
    Messages:
    2,829
    Likes Received:
    1
    Trophy Points:
    119
    Location:
    North Georgia
    Congrats! :thumbsup

    I had the same problem this year. My open does were a little too well conditioned and I stopped feeding grain altogether. Good quality grass hay and a little alfalfa blend hay was enough. I've reintroduced grain a little at a time to keep up with my gestating does and to put a little weight back on my buck after all his hard work.

    The alfalfa pellets should basically be treated as grain since they're a concentrate. 4 cups per day is per goat or total? Either way I'd be inclined to cut back since you're not trying to put weight on them at this point.
  4. Nov 9, 2010
    Chirpy

    Chirpy Loving the herd life

    Joined:
    May 18, 2009
    Messages:
    602
    Likes Received:
    2
    Trophy Points:
    105
    Location:
    Colorado
    I only give grain to my goats as an 'occasional' treat.

    I do give grain to my does in milk and does who are within a few weeks of kidding. I only give a small amount to start with and then up it after kidding.

    I am fortunate that my goats have pasture a good part of the year. However, if I'm milking a doe, she stays in a controlled area where I feed her so her milk doesn't change flavor.

    I give a good grass hay through the year except to my does in milk - they get a good alfalfa hay.

    Personally I don't breed my Nigis until they are 18 months old. I believe that they need to put their 'efforts' into maturing their own bodies before they start producing kids. Breeding them too early can lead to health issues later in life. Others do it differently.
  5. Nov 10, 2010
    helmstead

    helmstead Goat Mistress

    Joined:
    May 18, 2009
    Messages:
    3,013
    Likes Received:
    3
    Trophy Points:
    160
    Location:
    Alfordsville, IN
    Have to correct that - alfalfa pellets are equivalent to hay pound per pound - they just lack the fiber of a baled hay (in other words, should never replace baled hay or roughage - but are used when alfalfa hay isn't readily available or is low quality or is simply wasted by the goaties).

    I agree, if you feel they're getting overconditioned, cut back on the feed. I kinda like my juniors plump, though. I creep feed my juniors until they're too big to fit into the creep feeder (usually around 8 mos). They then go down to around 1/2 cup per day. My juniors also get a souped up mix of grains with a supplement like Calf Manna, alfalfa pellets and goat pellets.
  6. Nov 10, 2010
    aggieterpkatie

    aggieterpkatie The Shepherd

    Joined:
    Oct 23, 2009
    Messages:
    3,696
    Likes Received:
    3
    Trophy Points:
    160
    They provide some roughage, but alfalfa pellets are digested very quickly in the rumen, since they are already broken down into small pieces. There's little rumination needed with them, just like with grain. When there's less rumination, there's less saliva needed to buffer the rumen, which increases acidity in the rumen and can cause issues with acidosis. There can definitely be issues if people feed them improperly.

    ETA: I think we're all on the same page though. They're a good supplement for alfalfa hay, but they shouldn't be fed free choice like hay. At least I wouldn't.
  7. Nov 10, 2010
    cmjust0

    cmjust0 Loving the herd life

    Joined:
    Jul 10, 2009
    Messages:
    3,280
    Likes Received:
    1
    Trophy Points:
    149
    The saliva thing plays a part in urinary calculi, too. Goats naturally excrete blood phosphates through their saliva, and pelleted feeds don't require much saliva. Double whammy..

    Yet another reason why "concentrates" should be used in moderation with young males.

    Agreed.
  8. Nov 10, 2010
    Melissa'sDreamFarm

    Melissa'sDreamFarm Ridin' The Range

    Joined:
    Sep 9, 2010
    Messages:
    266
    Likes Received:
    1
    Trophy Points:
    74
    So I reduced the Alfalfa pellets to 1 cup and 1/4 cup grain 2 x a day. They are now eating more hay (orchard mix with fescue) when they weren't eating much of the 1st week. They are really hungry (or act like it) when I feed them. We'll see if this helps them trim down, I just hope its enough. I know if they start looking poorly I can up it again. It was dark when I got home yesterday and didn't get pictures. I promise pictures tomorrow. I just don't know if they will be "good" pictures as it's kind of dark when I get home at 5:30. lol
  9. Nov 10, 2010
    SDGsoap&dairy

    SDGsoap&dairy Loving the herd life

    Joined:
    Dec 7, 2009
    Messages:
    2,829
    Likes Received:
    1
    Trophy Points:
    119
    Location:
    North Georgia
    :thumbsup Thanks for clarifying!
  10. Nov 11, 2010
    Melissa'sDreamFarm

    Melissa'sDreamFarm Ridin' The Range

    Joined:
    Sep 9, 2010
    Messages:
    266
    Likes Received:
    1
    Trophy Points:
    74
    Here are my new babies!!! Wish I could have taken a picture of their rear ends. I now know how hard it is to get rear end pictures. Too me that is the area that looks more "plump".

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    Skye is the lighter colored doe and Mille is the darker one. They are just scrumptious!!! They are currently housed in what will be my buck house, when and "if" I decide to get one. We are remodeling their 8 x 12 stall in the barn and running extra electric wire to keep them separate from my paint horse gelding.

Share This Page