1. BYH Picture of the Week (POW) - Submit your Pics Now !!
    Click HERE!
    (if you are logged in, this notice can be dismissed using the "x" to the top right of the notice)

  2. Official Poll: What Herd Animals Do You Own?
    (if you are logged in, this announcement can be dismissed using the "x" to the top right of the notice)

Shelf-life of goat milk?

Discussion in 'Milking' started by TigerLilly, Sep 4, 2011.

  1. Sep 4, 2011
    TigerLilly

    TigerLilly Overrun with beasties

    Joined:
    Jun 27, 2010
    Messages:
    401
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    78
    Location:
    Florida
    How long does raw goat milk stay fresh in the fridge?
    I have been freezing mine because I don't drink that much; I should, so I'm trying to figure out how long it will last before it sours.
    Once it sours, can it be used for anything? Cheese?
    I'm just now getting to the point where I can use my goat milk for other things because I've gotten so much stock-piled. T
    he babies are being weaned & I'm getting more out of her, so that helps as well.
  2. Sep 4, 2011
    freemotion

    freemotion Self Sufficient Queen

    Joined:
    May 19, 2009
    Messages:
    3,271
    Likes Received:
    2
    Trophy Points:
    154
    Location:
    Western MA
    If your milking procedure is very clean, it should last for a couple of weeks at least. It keeps best in the back of the fridge, undisturbed.

    Soured milk, as long as it smells "good sour" and not "bad sour"....although I've never had raw milk go "bad sour," only store milk....can be used in baking in anything that calls for buttermilk, such as pancakes and biscuits, especially anything that calls for baking POWDER in the recipe.

    I don't use soured milk in cheesemaking, as the process incubates certain bacteria and you don't have control when you use soured milk....you may lose the entire batch, and when you spend a few hours making cheese and a few days, weeks, or months aging it....you want control, trust me on that one!

    The critters love the soured milk, too....hens, pigs, dogs all love it.

    To use up milk, consider.....shakes, chowders, kefir, yogurt, ice cream, pudding, hot chocolate, latte, soap making, and lots of cheeses.
  3. Sep 4, 2011
    TigerLilly

    TigerLilly Overrun with beasties

    Joined:
    Jun 27, 2010
    Messages:
    401
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    78
    Location:
    Florida
    Thanks for that--I was hoping that you would chime in on this.
    I'm not sure what differentiates "good sour" from "bad sour"....my nose is very sensitive & it ALL smells bad to me! :sick
    I don't plan on making ice cream or shake (almost lost 10 lbs AND quit smoking), but I am going to experiment with cheese & kefir--and definitely SOAP! LOVE THAT STUFF
  4. Sep 4, 2011
    kstaven

    kstaven Purple Cow/Moderator Moderator

    Joined:
    Jul 3, 2008
    Messages:
    2,012
    Likes Received:
    16
    Trophy Points:
    162
    Location:
    BC, Washington border
    Clean raw milk sours and naturally expels whey. While pasteurized product goes putrid and turns funky colors. The difference in smell is unmistakable. :sick
  5. Sep 5, 2011
    aggieterpkatie

    aggieterpkatie The Shepherd

    Joined:
    Oct 23, 2009
    Messages:
    3,692
    Likes Received:
    3
    Trophy Points:
    160
    If left long enough clean raw milk definitely gets funky and turns colors! Ask me how I know. :sick Usually mine is good for at least 10 days, but gets too "goaty" for me to use much past that.
  6. Sep 5, 2011
    kstaven

    kstaven Purple Cow/Moderator Moderator

    Joined:
    Jul 3, 2008
    Messages:
    2,012
    Likes Received:
    16
    Trophy Points:
    162
    Location:
    BC, Washington border
    It should separate into distinct layers with time. I can show you milk that has been in the bottle for over a year and there is no sign of mold fungus, discoloration or anything of the sort. We do this to show people what happens to milk and help explain the cheese making process.

Share This Page