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2 kids born with slight diarrhea, now getting worse

Discussion in 'Diseases & Injuries - Goats' started by KatyDaly, Aug 15, 2018.

  1. Aug 15, 2018
    KatyDaly

    KatyDaly Ridin' The Range

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    I have a buckling and doeling who had slightly runny poo when born. Now they are 3 months old and they seem to be getting worse. They had their CDT vaccines, and are mostly weaned at this point, although mom still will let them feed sometimes. They are just a little underweight compared to the other kids born around the same time, but are otherwise healthy and playful.

    Any ideas?
     
  2. Aug 15, 2018
    Latestarter

    Latestarter Novice; "Practicing" Animal Husbandry Golden Herd Member

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    Sounds like cocccidia... Just a thought. I'd take a fecal sample for analysis and treat accordingly.
     
    Donna R. Raybon likes this.
  3. Aug 15, 2018
    Southern by choice

    Southern by choice Herd Master Golden Herd Member

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    What color, smell, how runny? Liquid, pastey, does it stick to the butt or just run straight down?

    Have you had a fecal analysis? Is the dam tested for any diseases? Does the dam have any issues?
     
  4. Aug 15, 2018
    KatyDaly

    KatyDaly Ridin' The Range

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    Dark brown, not smelly, somewhere between liquid and pasty. Sticks to all the hair on the tail and legs, but not to the butt. Will get a pic soon.

    Not sure where to get a fecal analysis, but will ask around. Dam was not tested but has had no issues. She is 2 years old and delivered healthy kids last year.
     
  5. Aug 15, 2018
    Athena2344

    Athena2344 Chillin' with the herd

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    Sounds like cocci, my friends heifer developed a case of it after pooping and peeing in her feed bowl, and ingesting trace amounts of her waste.
     
  6. Aug 15, 2018
    Donna R. Raybon

    Donna R. Raybon Loving the herd life

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    Where are you located?

    I would treat for coccidia and deworm. Use something that gets tapes, like Valbazen, wait ten days and deworm again. The L4 stage of barberpole worm encysts and can then come out of stasis after you deworm. Since they are immature you don't see any eggs on a fecal, yet animal is wormy again.
    Goat tapeworms do not use flea as do the cat/dog tape. Instead they use snail/slugs. Adult animals are usually not bothered, but the young goats can end up with bowel blockage due to tape masses and die.
     
  7. Aug 15, 2018
    KatyDaly

    KatyDaly Ridin' The Range

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    All helpful info, thank you folks! We are in central/upstate NY near Cooperstown.
     
  8. Aug 17, 2018
    Wehner Homestead

    Wehner Homestead Herd Master Golden Herd Member

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    Fecal analysis are done by vets or other animal enthusiasts that have taught themselves to know what they are looking at.

    Valbazen was mentioned by another poster...I just wanted to say that this is not safe for pregnant goats. (I realize you asked about babies but it never hurts to make this clear and avoid losses.)
     
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  9. Aug 17, 2018
    Donna R. Raybon

    Donna R. Raybon Loving the herd life

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    Valbazen labeled ok for sheep in last 2/3 of gestation. I have used it in goats after first 60 days of gestation without any issues.

    I deworm three weeks before I intend to breed. Followed by another deworm 10 days later. Next deworm will be after 60 days bred. After that I check inner eyelid color and act accordingly. Especially closely monitored are first/ second fresheners as they are still growing, does carrying 4 or more kids and geriatric does. Usually do not deworm again until freshening.
     
  10. Aug 17, 2018
    Southern by choice

    Southern by choice Herd Master Golden Herd Member

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    x2

    That is a lot of deworming. Have you considered running McMasters and targeting your worst offenders?

    We never deworm unless analysis dictates we do so. One of our Nigerians had quads, quints, quads and only 6 months later did she need dewormed. So that is over 3 years and 13 kids without needing a dewormer. Our average herd generally requires 1 treatment round a year. With the excessive rains and not being able to mow and keep the grass down we may need to deworm as the wet humid environment is prime for parasites.

    Most do avoid Valbazen altogether for pregnant goats as there are safer dewormers and why risk it. Kids born from Valbazeon exposure (first month exposure) are some of the worst deformities one can imagine. IMO I don't want that anytime during gestation.
     
    Wehner Homestead likes this.