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2017 Bee hive swarm information, history, lessons, successes, etc.

Discussion in 'Bee Swarms, Bee Behavior, & Bee Queens' started by soarwitheagles, Jan 29, 2017.

  1. Jul 31, 2017
    Latestarter

    Latestarter Novice; "Practicing" Animal Husbandry Moderator

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    They may be placing brood in the center box simply "because" you gave them the three deeps... Don't know, but maybe if you scaled it back to only two, they'd start using the lower one like they're "supposed" to... ;) No matter really... as long as it's working the way you have it. :)
     
  2. Aug 3, 2017
    soarwitheagles

    soarwitheagles Loving the herd life

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    Happy, I am not so sure what to say about when queens begin to lay eggs in different places in the hive...it happens here too. I am sure someone knows what causes it and what can be done to alleviate the problem...but I have no clue why it occurs.

    We have had a number of hives where the queen decided to lay eggs in various boxes...I don't stress, I am glad she keeps laying!

    For removing honey, we must remove honey manually on frames that have a mixture of brood and honey, or we simply leave the honey there for the bees.
     
  3. Aug 4, 2017
    babsbag

    babsbag Herd Master

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    In the past I have left the honey with brood for the bees. But when it is in a super then I have to leave the super for the winter or put the frame in a deep and they build comb around it. Not good.

    @Latestarter I gave them 3 deeps this year as they kept putting the brood in the top of two and no where to store their honey reserve. The bottom was always pollen. They are happy and I have the boxes to spare so all is good. They didn't swarm this year either, maybe because of the extra room?
     
  4. Aug 4, 2017
    soarwitheagles

    soarwitheagles Loving the herd life

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    2.JPG 4.JPG Babs and HC,

    I am still a total beginner when it comes to raising bees, but I noticed in our hives, when the flow is not very strong, then the bees concentrate more on building brood than bringing in honey. Due to the severe drought, and the fact that no one planted and grew any nectar producing irrigated summer long crops nearby, we had a very, very weak flow for the last 4 years...and our honey production was so small, we never got any honey at all, instead, we had to feed every hive the sugar syrup and the pollen sub.

    Fast forward to this year, we have had a totally miraculous, non-stop super strong flow since February...the result:

    Massive honey harvest as in 2 full supers per hive...honey harvest of 120 pounds per hive at times...

    I also noticed recently that the brood production went down in a lot of hives and the bees focused much more on filling every nook and cranny with honey! We have never seen this here ever before! It is unprecedented. I also recently discovered another massive field nearby that some farmer or rancher planted some type of flowering plants that go nearly as far as the eye can see...yup, as in over a thousand acres of it, and it is irrigated. Our bees just will not stop filling the hives with wax, honey, pollen, brood, etc. I install new bare frames, with nothing on them [no wire, no plastic, etc.] and within one week they are completely drawn out with wax and beginning to fill with honey...and this is in August!

    All the swarms we caught are now in boxes and they are producing like gang busters. We are hoping for one more set of splits, and if we can find the time to do it, we will be over 60 hives. We started with 5 this spring. Somehow we have had a 100% success rate with our nucs...each one produced a wonderful mated and laying queen. We chose a lot of unorthodox methods...as in placing each nuc in a separate tree! We went from a 90% failure rate on our nucs on bee stands last year to a 100% success rate this year.

    We are incredibly happy now...

    I am posting a pic of one of the frames that has no wire, no plastic, no nothing...and it is only two weeks old.

    Other pics are of our mistake yesterday...we painted one of our new queens and got too much paint on the poor girl!

    Pic two is of a queen we successfully painted!

    Enjoy!

    frame with no foundation or wire.JPG 1.JPG
     
    Last edited: Aug 4, 2017
    HomeOnTheRange and Latestarter like this.