2019 Honeybee swarms, lessons, successes and learning experiences

soarwitheagles

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Hi again everyone!

So sorry for being off the grid so long...went through some challenging times. It sure is good to be back in the saddle and riding again!

Caught our 5th swarm a couple of minutes ago. This swarm arrived in the same exact spot as another swarm about a week ago.

So far, this year has been far slower with catching swarms...could be due to the incredible amount of rain we have had. This has been the 4th highest ever recorded level of rain here in written history. Some areas of the Sierras here received over 50 ft. of snow. Wow! Not complaining, but thankful, especially after a 5 year extreme drought. But I think this weather has had an impact on the swarm tendencies.

Presently had 8-10 traps placed. If the swarm activity increase substantially, we will place 20-25 traps.

Have a wonderful day everyone!

Soar

1.JPG
Swarm 5.JPG
 

soarwitheagles

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Wow that's amazing! I don't know much about beekeeping...are these wild bees that you caught? if so, I've never heard of that and how do you do it? :)

Thank you Amber! Some people call these honey bees feral bees. Others call them wild bees. Still others call them mutts! I simply call them blessing from heaven. :D

I’m really glad you are back! Hope you get a lot of swarms.

Thanks Baymule and good to hear you are still here!

Ok, crazy as it sounds...swarm 6 landed at 4 pm.

Here's a video of it:


Second video, 3 minutes later:


And finally a pic of it after the majority of the honey bees crawled inside:

Swarm 6b.JPG
 

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Baymule

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Wow, that is so interesting. I have to agree with you on the wild swarms. One thing to consider, they may be mutts, but they are healthy. They obviously are not afflicted with the diseases that kill off hive after hive of bees. Blessings from Heaven indeed!

We buy honey from a place in Livingston, Tx, where we used to live. They have a huge operation, family owned and operated. They have hives placed all over southeast Texas, all the way to the Gulf of Mexico. They have several large buildings where they process the honey, plus an on site store.
Here is their website. For the 30+ years I've known them, this is their business, it supports them and quite a few employees.

http://www.rudyshoney.com/
 

Bunnylady

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are these wild bees that you caught?

Since the honeybee isn't native to the Americas, technically, they aren't "wild." Until a friend on another forum started keeping bees, I hadn't been aware that there are a number of strains, or breeds, of bees; with these being of uncertain ancestry, they may be "mutts.":hu

I watched a video a while back about a guy in Texas who makes a living from the infamous "killer bees." When people have them on their property, they call him, and he collects them and puts them in a hive. He keeps his hives in desert/scrub areas where no one goes; they are too dangerous to have in more civilized locations. They are a bit more prone to up and take off on him than the more domesticated strains, but if they stay put, he says they produce lots of honey without needing to be treated for mites and such. Of course, the bee suit is mandatory, not optional, with them! (Manna from heaven with a price?)

I've never seen a swarm, but I think beekeeping in general and this part in particular is just fascinating! Good luck with the trapping!
 

AmberLops

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Since the honeybee isn't native to the Americas, technically, they aren't "wild." Until a friend on another forum started keeping bees, I hadn't been aware that there are a number of strains, or breeds, of bees; with these being of uncertain ancestry, they may be "mutts.":hu

I watched a video a while back about a guy in Texas who makes a living from the infamous "killer bees." When people have them on their property, they call him, and he collects them and puts them in a hive. He keeps his hives in desert/scrub areas where no one goes; they are too dangerous to have in more civilized locations. They are a bit more prone to up and take off on him than the more domesticated strains, but if they stay put, he says they produce lots of honey without needing to be treated for mites and such. Of course, the bee suit is mandatory, not optional, with them! (Manna from heaven with a price?)

I've never seen a swarm, but I think beekeeping in general and this part in particular is just fascinating! Good luck with the trapping!
That's very fascinating! Thanks for the info :)
 

soarwitheagles

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Wow, that is so interesting. I have to agree with you on the wild swarms. One thing to consider, they may be mutts, but they are healthy. They obviously are not afflicted with the diseases that kill off hive after hive of bees. Blessings from Heaven indeed!

We buy honey from a place in Livingston, Tx, where we used to live. They have a huge operation, family owned and operated. They have hives placed all over southeast Texas, all the way to the Gulf of Mexico. They have several large buildings where they process the honey, plus an on site store.
Here is their website. For the 30+ years I've known them, this is their business, it supports them and quite a few employees.

http://www.rudyshoney.com/

Nice operation Baymule! My dream is to start a beekeeping company too with a large shop and many blessed employees. Giving it our all now!

Since the honeybee isn't native to the Americas, technically, they aren't "wild." Until a friend on another forum started keeping bees, I hadn't been aware that there are a number of strains, or breeds, of bees; with these being of uncertain ancestry, they may be "mutts.":hu

I watched a video a while back about a guy in Texas who makes a living from the infamous "killer bees." When people have them on their property, they call him, and he collects them and puts them in a hive. He keeps his hives in desert/scrub areas where no one goes; they are too dangerous to have in more civilized locations. They are a bit more prone to up and take off on him than the more domesticated strains, but if they stay put, he says they produce lots of honey without needing to be treated for mites and such. Of course, the bee suit is mandatory, not optional, with them! (Manna from heaven with a price?)

I've never seen a swarm, but I think beekeeping in general and this part in particular is just fascinating! Good luck with the trapping!

Bunnylady,

Yes, you are referring to the AHB [Africanized Hybrid Bee] and they can be utterly deadly. Most of our southern states already have them. They started in Brazil when a fool created a hybrid, then let them get out. They have killed many, many people. Incredibly irresponsible and people are still dying horrific deaths due to this...

That's very fascinating! Thanks for the info :)

yw
 
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