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3 way grain

Discussion in 'Feeding Time - Llamas and Alpacas' started by Katie burgoyne, Dec 8, 2017.

  1. Dec 8, 2017
    Katie burgoyne

    Katie burgoyne Chillin' with the herd

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    My local feed store doesn't have alpaca/llama grain they offered to order it for me. He isn't familiar with alpacas at all but I read some of the threads to him about feeding. From this thread https://www.alpacanation.com/forum/topic.asp?TOPIC_ID=10874

    "Read the labels on the different types of horse feed, you will find the same ingredients just in different levels. You can get some premium horse feeds in sweet versions and in pelleted versions for a lot less than alpaca/llama feed when the grain prices start going up. The biggest problem with sweet feed is that it can get hard when cold so you have to break it up. I have used it, and had that problem and it was easy to over come by simply banging it with a short stick."

    He suggests "3 way grain" i took a picture of the label. It's $12 for a 50 lb bag. This is more than half off of what I was paying. Can they have this?
     

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  2. Dec 8, 2017
    Latestarter

    Latestarter Novice; "Practicing" Animal Husbandry Golden Herd Member

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    I'm not familiar with the specifics, but if you compare the labels and they are similar, it should be fine. You should just keep an eye on your animals over time to make sure they aren't "losing" something from the switch... weight/condition/etc. Of course you're probably like the rest of us and are watching the animals all the time anyway... I'm kinda of the belief that it's like medications... you have name brands and generics that in most cases are the exact same ingredients and though may be slightly different, generally not enough to matter, at substantially less cost.

    @luvmypets or @Bruce you folks have these critters... :hu
     
  3. Dec 9, 2017
    Bruce

    Bruce Herd Master

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    I buy this for my 2 boys but it isn't cheap:
    https://www.poulingrain.com/products/193
    They are a family owned Vermont business, now in the 3rd generation. They make it to complement the minerals, grasses and hays common to the state. For example, I think most of Vermont is selenium deficient and Poulin's alpaca/llama pellets have a bit more than that found in the huge national brands. My boys only get maybe 1/2 cup twice a day so it is more of a treat than a feed. I've been adding in sweet feed of late to bribe them. They like the llama/alpaca pellets but they really like the sweet feed. They have a bin of Poulin alpaca/llama minerals and a plain salt block. I don't think they have touched either so I ASSUME they are getting what they need from the pasture, hay and pellets.

    The label you showed doesn't have a lot of information. To my knowledge the 1 thing you need to be really careful of is copper. Alpacas can't have much of it whereas I think goats need it. I did notice that the crude protein in yours is 9% and in Poulin's it is 15%, fiber in yours is max 10%, Poulin's is 15%. Alpacas evolved to do well on the less nutrient dense grasses found in their home range, which apparently is around 11,000 -16,000 feet!
     
    Last edited: Dec 9, 2017