Ella Anders

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I have two Nigerian dwarf/pygora wethers who are 7 months old and super friendly they are brothers so they get along really well their names are Fred and Barney. Barney is the cuddly one and Fred is just attention seeking. On Sunday I got two doelings that are around 4 months old Angie and millie they are quite a bit smaller than the boys from the boys previous owner. Fred won't let them eat I give hay in a bowl and in a hay net every morning but Fred supervises each bowl he eats out of one and as soon as he catches one of the girls trying to eat out of the other one he runs over and headbutts them. I feed grain every night to all my goats and I do it to where the boys are outside and the girls girls girls are in the house I wanna say that it's 9' by 13' but I'm not sure it's pretty big and it used to be a chicken coop so the nesting boxes are still on the wall and the roosting bars are folded down. The problem is is I'm supposed to leave from Friday afternoon to Sunday night. Normally I wouldn't have a problem because when I leave I lock the boys in the coop and leave the windows open for air flow but I'm worried that Fred won't let the girls eat all weekend what should I do😟
 

Bunnylady

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My experience with goats makes me agree, it is normal for the top goat to bully subordinates, especially new ones. Somehow, you're going to need to make it impossible for Fred to prevent the girls from eating, or the girls will get basically nothing all weekend. That means, either so many food sources that Fred cannot possibly cover them all, or some kind of barrier with him on one side and them on the other.

Depending on the strength of your goats' personalities, this may be an issue you deal with for as long as you own them. I wound up having to put feed pans in places where you couldn't see one from another around the barn, or my most dominant goat made feeding time take about 3 times as long because he'd chase goats away from the pans as soon as he saw them get near them. It was either that, or stand there among them, and chase him back every time he tried to run another goat off.

:hide Incidentally, I would not lock these girls up in a 9' x 13' space with Fred until all are getting along swimmingly, or he may kill one asserting his dominance over an animal that can't escape. I used to have rather bitter riddle - Q: how many goats can you fit in a 12' x 12' horse stall? A: Only one, if it's Spike.
 
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Beekissed

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Tether the wether out on the yard and leave the others where they have access to food. People used to tether goats all the time when I was young and you'd see a lone billy goat tethered in areas they wanted the yard kept down or weeds eaten. As long as they can't get tangled and have access to water and feed, you can tether much like you would a dog.
 

frustratedearthmother

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I would be very concerned about tethering a goat if you are going to be gone. You might come home to a goat with a broken leg or who has choked himself by getting tangled. OR - he would be a sitting duck to any predators that might happen by.

Putting up a divider sounds like a great solution.
 

Bunnylady

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I would be very concerned about tethering a goat if you are going to be gone. You might come home to a goat with a broken leg or who has choked himself by getting tangled. OR - he would be a sitting duck to any predators that might happen by.
In my county, it is now illegal to tie a dog out, unless you are out there with it to supervise what happens to it. Depending on where you live, tying an animal out when you aren't there might even get you charged with animal cruelty.
 

frustratedearthmother

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Depending on where you live, tying an animal out when you aren't there might even get you charged with animal cruelty.
Personally - I think it's a recipe for disaster. Even if the worst doesn't happen, they could still get tangled and not be able to reach food or water for the entire weekend.
 

Mini Horses

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Even if loose, he won't leave the others....could get into trouble but, won't go far! He will stay with "his" herd. Predators are a problem in some areas. Depending on how badly he wants back with others, yeah -- those rascals can be a problem. If you are home one day, turn him loose and watch -- you will see what I say is true. Animals have habits.
 

Ridgetop

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Use a divider to separate the doelings from the wethers. BUT the problem is that if you are gone for several days, Fred may get tangled in the divider panel, or knock it down resulting i other goats getting tangled in the panel.

Can you have anyone come over to feed for you while you are out of town?
 

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