A MS girl with a love for Jerseys

Applevalley1

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Hello everyone! My name is Jamie and I live in very rural Simpson County, MS. I call it the land that at&t forgot LOL. We are on 48 acres and I have just recently developed an addiction for jersey cows. I have been raising dairy bottle bulls for about 5 years now and finally decided to buy a nurse cow a few months ago to offset milk replacer costs. I am now up to 8 head, which includes a 7 month old jersey bull named Taz that I've had since he was 5 days old, a 4 month old jersey bull calf, my 1st big dairy cow Lorraine that is a 1st calf heifer(the best 1st calf heifer ever BTW bc she nurses her baby, my 4 month old bull, and gives me a gallon a day and had never been milked when I got her and from day 1 she let me milk her right beside her calf no matter if we were in the barn or out in the field. Couldn't have asked for a better starter cow), her 4 month old heifer Heidi(they are both mulberry jerseys), 2 6 month old holstein angus X heifers, a 10 month old mulberry jersey heifer, and a 3 year old mulberry jersey cow that is heavy bred and due to calve within a week that I call Boss Lady. I have 2 daughters and 1 son. A cowdog named Spicy that is 14yrs old, a 5yr old yard dog named Skeeter, my Itty bitty partner in crime that is inseparable from me that is a long haired chihuahua named Tiny that looks like a mini German Shephard for real and she is 3yrs old. I came here in hopes of finding someone with some dairy cow knowledge that will answer a few questions I have.
 

Mini Horses

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Welcome to the herd. AND we have the perfect cow person for you -- @farmerjan. Get your questions listed....I'm certain she'll answer you. A farmer & milk tester in VA.

Of course we can help with chickens, pigs, goats, sheep, rabbits and so on. Pretty diverse here. Couple things -- we like pictures! Let's see those cows! And in your profile, please add some location so we can be more helpful. Our Australians are in winter, TX is in deep heat -- some of our replies could be more helpful with a general location.

So -- 1. pictures 2, questions 3. location :celebrate


I welcome you from VA. Waiting to hear your adventures. I don't have cows but would love a Jersey -- those huge brown eyes! :love Instead, I have a herd of Saanen goats. Yes, milking happening here.
 

Applevalley1

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I'm not quite sure how to add my location but I am in Simpson county, Mississippi outside of Mendenhall city limits in the middle of nowhere east central MS and it is in the 90°F range here now in the wonderful humid deep south. I will gladly upload some pics of my herd. I forgot to mention we raise yorkshire hogs as well. I bred English orpingtons for a few years but my daddy got sick a few years ago and I had to sell my flock and move in with him to take care of him but am slowly adding back everything except for rabbits and peafowl. Here goes trying to upload pics, I'm not the best with technology lol but put a pole in my hand and I think I'm a pro bass fisherwoman haha. And for the purpose of my questions, I just got the 2 7 month old heifers, 10month old heifer, and heavy bred cow like 5 days ago, I've had Taz 7 months, little bull 4 months, and lorraine and Heidi were a pair and ive had them for around 3 months +/-
 

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CntryBoy777

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Welcome!!....from western central Florida..... :frow
Ya can ask questions anytime, anywhere....but, I would suggest either in the cattle threads or start ya a thread in the member journals forum...the reason being, it will be more easily accessed by ya and will assist others that may be "lurking" for cattle info...:)...as far as your "location", if ya click your avatar on the bar at the top of the page the dropdown will allow ya to edit your profile and can add a general location that will be added to your banner....:)....I've never had cows, but have always admired jerseys....:love....until about a year and a half ago, we lived in Senatobia up in NW Mississippi...about 200 miles up I-55 from ya....have traveled US 49 many, many times and we considered moving down around Hattiesburg, but came here...closer to DD4....my family roots come from Kosciusko and West....anywho sure Glad to have ya here!!......:thumbsup
Again....:welcome
 

Beekissed

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Are you concerned at all about the imprinting on the bull calves due to bottle feeding? I've read that Jersey bulls are difficult to manage without that handicap but after imprinting on a human with bottle feeding, downright dangerous upon reaching sexual maturity. Not something you want around you or your kids, no matter how sweet and cute they are now.






 

farmerjan

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Just a real quick hello and welcome. I am not an expert, but have had dairy animals for a long time. I will try to answer any questions you ask. The articles that @Beekissed referred to should be read and you need to take them to heart. I am not of the same thoughts on some of it but there are valid points. That said, jersey bulls are one of the most dangerous..... and fastest moving..... of the dairy breeds. But we can discuss that in another post. If you use the @ sign and the person you want to reference, it will show up in the alerts for that person and will generate a response quicker.
 

Jesusfreak101

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I get worried about this with my heifer calf she taken up wanting to play and head butts my leg. Make a me worry about the future with her. She abmeat breed and does have goat in with her and has fence access to the cattle herd. Still worries me.
 

farmerjan

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I haven't seen any questions so can't really say much. You are right though, getting a first calf heifer that is that quiet and accommodating is absolutely the best. I have had some that are great and some that are true witches and some all the different levels inbetween.

I am wondering why you are keeping the jersey's as bulls? I realize that maybe you are thinking breeding in the future. But keeping 2 is not a good idea. The few months difference will not make a difference once they get more mature. Jerseys also mature sooner. You need to be aware that the heifers also will mature earlier. I have had jersey and jersey crosses and even holstein/beef crosses come in heat as young as 10 months old. You DO NOT want them to get bred that young.... but it only takes one quick breeding by the bull and they could get caught. Once a bull gets mature enough to breed, and has an opportunity to do so, you are in a much more precarious position with trying to deal with him. I have had a couple of jersey bulls; specifically to breed a few of my cows. Have not had any problems.... but more often than not you will. I also have used them, then sent them to slaughter as soon as they have done the job they were kept for.

Any jersey bull calf that i get, whether born here or bought as a calf to go on a nurse cow, is banded by 3 months. PERIOD. I have raised more calves than I can count over the years and have done bottles, buckets, and nurse cows and by far the nurse cows produce the best calves with the least amount of cost..... if you have a cow that will take the calves. Some of mine are great, a few are not, most can be convinced to take them with a little time and effort. I usually have 3 calves per cow, sometimes even 4 if the cow is a heavy milker. I used to do at least 2 groups per cow, so she would raise from 4-8 calves during her lactation but now I usually only do one set, let them stay on longer, and feed less grain after about 3 months. There are all sorts of tricks and ways to do it.

If for no other reason, please take it seriously that the heifers you are raising need to be kept separately from the bulls, so they don't get bred too young. Often you will not even know they got caught, and next thing you know at 14-16 months they are looking awfully round and starting to develop an udder and it is way too late to abort them. It compromises their growth tremendously.... even if they manage to deliver and even raise a calf at that young an age. They will always be "stunted" to some extent and often breeding back is a problem.

Looking forward to hearing more about what you are doing, want to do, and if I can give you any help at all.
 

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