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A NEW DIRECTION FOR THE OLD RAM

Discussion in 'Everything Else Sheep' started by The Old Ram-Australia, Aug 18, 2017.

  1. Sep 11, 2017
    Goat Whisperer

    Goat Whisperer Herd Master

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    Can you post a link?

    There is another long range cattle dewormer that has caused a lot of issues…
     
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  2. Sep 11, 2017
    Eteda

    Eteda Ridin' The Range

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    www.wvs.com.au/media/custom/upload/attachments/508e0b65177d3.pdf

    Cydectin Long Acting Injection for Sheep contains moxidectin, a second generation macrocyclic lactone. It is effective against sensitive strains of the following parasites and provides protection against severe challenge by Haemonchus contortus (barber's pole worm) for up to 4 months.
    upload_2017-9-11_21-51-21.jpeg
     
  3. Sep 11, 2017
    Eteda

    Eteda Ridin' The Range

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    hope that link and picture shows up. Im much better at farming the computing. LOL
     
  4. Sep 11, 2017
    Green Acres Farm

    Green Acres Farm True BYH Addict

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  5. Sep 11, 2017
    Eteda

    Eteda Ridin' The Range

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    it is funny how they mention the use for the longe range just for meningeal worm for camelids since their it doesnt work on them any way. but they say nothing for its use for sheep or goats for this purpose even in a lower dose. the herd my very first sheep came from in 07 was if you will resistant to ivermection. the article mentions moxidectin as the one exception for resistant build up. its been 10 years. my herd, same ewes, same pastures, started with 2 ewes and a ram. bought two ewes in 09 one in 2010,nothing was bought or brought in since 2010. every thing including the rams were born hear. 80% of your worms are in 20% of your herd. If you can identify this 20% and target their worm burden you may not have much of a worm problem at all. it will always be your old. infirmed. really young or your most timid. however if you have a small enough herd to separate these few at feeding time you can build their natural resistance and lower your worm burden even lower. because it will be 20% of that small herd in stead of 20% of the whole flock. it is not easy. but I find if I separate the ewes at night into an area that has unlimited hay, salt, minerals and a lick tub while feeding up and turn them back in with the main herd in the mornings it is a lot easier. Hear the lambs are in the creep area seperated only by a cattle panel and a wood pallet. they have 24/7 access to the area. they have toys and night lights to encourage its use along with salt. minerals. baking soda. water, hay and a lick tub. lambs sleeping in the creep pen.JPG
     
  6. Sep 18, 2017 at 4:13 AM
    The Old Ram-Australia

    The Old Ram-Australia Loving the herd life

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    THE NEXT STEP:getting together a gene pool.G'day,so over the last few weeks we have purchased genetics for the new flock.Because of the "big dry" prices for mature aged(as far out as Sound month) ewes have come within our price range.We have in the main purchased stud or full blood females for under A$100.00 per head.

    Currently we have 6 un-related lines of females and 3/4 of un-related males for a total of about 40 + head.This is a good start for us and we can now proceed on a very selective basis.It will be in the early part of 2018 before we sell the majority of our Suffolk's only retaining a small group (about 20 ewes ) and a couple of rams to produce terminal sires for the new flock.

    The Suffolk as a terminal sire should go some way to overcoming the denseness of the Dorper meat for the local market which is predominately English Shortwools with their good eating qualities.We may sell some lines "over the hooks" so we can get the "feed-back data" from the processors. The new groups are settling in well in spite of the fact that they came from flocks which were predominately "hand fed",they have also quickly "discovered" our mineral mix and line up with our "home bred" stock for their share at the water points...T.O.R.
     
  7. Sep 18, 2017 at 8:25 PM
    Baymule

    Baymule Herd Master

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    By "big dry" I surmise you mean a drought. Sheep are being sold because of a drought, what age are these ewes? What would the price be were it not for a drought?

    Do you have buyers for your Suffolks or will you take them to auction? I am glad that you are keeping a small flock of them. You worked hard to develop their genetics and it would be a sham to look out over the pastures and not see any of them.
     
  8. Sep 18, 2017 at 11:02 PM
    The Old Ram-Australia

    The Old Ram-Australia Loving the herd life

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    G'day Bay, the "dry" I refer to is not yet a "drought",but if we do not receive rain in the next month I'm sure it will be declared for our district.Our main worry is the state of our stock water ,with some of our "dams" now dry and so we have to open more gates than I would in a normal season so the stock can access their daily water needs.The new group is being watered from our house supply at the minute,but this cannot go on much longer.I do have a paddock with sufficient water but I really wanted it to rain first before I grazed it as it has a "very low worm burden".The same is for the Suffolk's who almost all have lambs at "foot".
    On the subject of the disposal of the Suffolk flock,once it rains I do not anticipate any problems,earlier this year I advertised about 30 ewes on a web site,they all sold overnight and I was still getting inquiry's a week later.They all sold for the asking price "no questions asked".The reason for keeping a select group is explained in the earlier post and it will only be a days "shearing" to clean them up each year.I had to smile when you said about"looking out over the pasture and not seeing them".All I see is a heap of "shearing or crutching",and all this will evaporate with the "new flock"...T.O.R.
     
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  9. Sep 19, 2017 at 3:42 AM
    The Old Ram-Australia

    The Old Ram-Australia Loving the herd life

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    G'day Bay, I forgot to address one of your questions.Breeders are adopting different approaches,some are selling the "bottom" of their lamb drop while others are selling the older end of their breeders.In the "mature group" I will look at anything with a "sound month",because we will get at least 2 lamb drops from them and then they will go over the hooks as mutton.

    In the stud situation ewes can command upwards of $200.00 and rams tend to start at $400.00 but can easily cost $800.00 for the best genetics.How does thast compare for prices in the U.S.?..T.O.R.
     
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  10. Sep 19, 2017 at 7:38 PM
    Baymule

    Baymule Herd Master

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    A registered Dorper or Katahdin ram sells for $200 to $1,000 but mostly in the $400-$600 range. I have not priced ewes. I bought my 4 Dorper/Katahdin ewes, bred to a Katahdin ram for $220 each and thought I got a bargain.