Advice and opinions on what to get next.

MtViking

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The rabbits are going good and just added chickens for eggs to the homestead. Now I need to decide what’s next to add. What ever it is probably won’t be added until this fall or next spring more than likely it will be next year, but I’d like to get started on fencing and housing for said critter. I’m thinking milk goats Or pigs next. I’d like to have both eventually but one thing at a time to keep my sanity and make sure I can handle extra work loads. I’m leaning towards pigs next because they seem a bit easier than milk goats. But I would like your thoughts and opinions. As far as breeds go I’m thinking Idaho pasture pigs if I’m going to get a breeding pair, or if I’m just going to get feeder pigs to butcher once a year than I’ll probably find something close to home I could pick up off Craigslist or something. Anyways give me your ideas, what do you think?
 

Baymule

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Personally, we get feeder pigs, preferably heritage breeds. I don't want to keep hog breeding stock, but I will patronize those who do. Feeder pigs are easy to raise.

Here's how I built my pig pen. Of course with climate differences, you would have to modify what I did, but it will give you ideas.

 

farmerjan

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Go with some feeder pigs. They will have a 4-8 month time frame there all according to when you get them, how big they are, etc.....Most people get them in spring, then get them butchered in fall before the weather gets too cold. They get the advantages of any/all waste feed/garden produce etc. Pork in the freezer for those cold days of wanting to cook.... pork roast in the oven, bacon and sausage for breakfast or even for a quick winter supper. No hauling water in 0 temps... and if it goes good, then the next year you can do it again... or decide that you want to do goats. They are a little bigger commitment with milking......Timing again is important. You might get the pigs into the freezer then find some goats that someone else doesn't want or can't take through the winter....
This way, too, you can decide how much you like the pigs..... and think about the commitment of having breeding stock. They are bigger, and will need to be fed year round for a max of 3 litters in about 2 years. 3 mos, 3 weeks, 3 days, and 3 in the morning is the saying around here for farrowing. Can't keep the boar in with the sow all the time so an extra pen....
 

MtViking

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Personally, we get feeder pigs, preferably heritage breeds. I don't want to keep hog breeding stock, but I will patronize those who do. Feeder pigs are easy to raise.

Here's how I built my pig pen. Of course with climate differences, you would have to modify what I did, but it will give you ideas.

That’s a great set up. I’m going to start looking for materials money is right with all the Covid crap and work slowing down. I just started a new job so I’m gonna start saving up for the stuff needed and searching classifieds and I think we will try out a few feeders next year. I would like to get a pasture pig like the Kune kune or the Idaho pasture pigs but I think I’ll start out with what ever I can find local and affordable for the first round. Thanks for the advice.
 

MtViking

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Go with some feeder pigs. They will have a 4-8 month time frame there all according to when you get them, how big they are, etc.....Most people get them in spring, then get them butchered in fall before the weather gets too cold. They get the advantages of any/all waste feed/garden produce etc. Pork in the freezer for those cold days of wanting to cook.... pork roast in the oven, bacon and sausage for breakfast or even for a quick winter supper. No hauling water in 0 temps... and if it goes good, then the next year you can do it again... or decide that you want to do goats. They are a little bigger commitment with milking......Timing again is important. You might get the pigs into the freezer then find some goats that someone else doesn't want or can't take through the winter....
This way, too, you can decide how much you like the pigs..... and think about the commitment of having breeding stock. They are bigger, and will need to be fed year round for a max of 3 litters in about 2 years. 3 mos, 3 weeks, 3 days, and 3 in the morning is the saying around here for farrowing. Can't keep the boar in with the sow all the time so an extra pen....
Great advice. This is what I think we’re going to do. I’ll have to slowly chip away and getting a pen set up and the equipment and hopefully next spring we can grab a few feeders to try out. I’d like to train them on electric so I can let them go in the back woods and root around out there for the summer.
 

Mini Horses

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I have found the pigs easier to respect electric than a goat. :D

You don't "have to" use milking goats -- unless you do want the milk, of course. There are meat breeds And while you can milk either, butcher either...they produce better quantity of meat/milk respective of their type. I have a herd of dairy and wanted to add a few meat types this Spring. Haven't with all the close downs, etc. Will do but, probably not be until next year now.

This CV19 has set a whole lot of people on their tails, spinning! I'm not spending if I don't need to because I'm not sure where this economy will take us.
 

MtViking

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I have found the pigs easier to respect electric than a goat. :D

You don't "have to" use milking goats -- unless you do want the milk, of course. There are meat breeds And while you can milk either, butcher either...they produce better quantity of meat/milk respective of their type. I have a herd of dairy and wanted to add a few meat types this Spring. Haven't with all the close downs, etc. Will do but, probably not be until next year now.

This CV19 has set a whole lot of people on their tails, spinning! I'm not spending if I don't need to because I'm not sure where this economy will take us.
Yeah it’s crazy. It’s this kind of crap that made us want to be self sufficient 10 years ago just took us this long to finally afford property to do it on. Glad we have the rabbits and we will have eggs come fall. It would be nice to have another source of meat. Unfortunately our garden failed pretty spectacularly this year. Have some sort of larvae in the soil that got all the root vegetables before they were ready to harvest and the grasshoppers got the rest. I don’t know if it’s everywhere but I haven’t seen grass hoppers this bad in years! Sucks but oh well not much I can do about it now, our growing season is too short to get two crops out of much. I will try turnips I’m the little greenhouse we have once I harvest the tomatoes. So it won’t be a total loss but won’t be anything to preserve or can, we had a huge patch of lettuce we had fresh salad every day almost. The hoppers took it all in a weekend
 

thistlebloom

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@MtViking , I can commiserate on the grasshopper issue. This year they aren't bad, they all must be at your place :confused:. Here's a link to a product I've used with some success. The County extension pest guy told me I was wasting my money on this treatment, because they can vector in from far away, but I saw definite results. You can read up on Nosema Locustae, hopefully Planet Natural is not the only place that carries the bait. I'm sad to see they are closing.
 

MtViking

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@MtViking , I can commiserate on the grasshopper issue. This year they aren't bad, they all must be at your place :confused:. Here's a link to a product I've used with some success. The County extension pest guy told me I was wasting my money on this treatment, because they can vector in from far away, but I saw definite results. You can read up on Nosema Locustae, hopefully Planet Natural is not the only place that carries the bait. I'm sad to see they are closing.
I didn’t get the link. Could you try and send it again. I’m willing to try anything. I don’t know if I have time to replant anything this year since Montana has such a short growing season but it’s worth a shot and if it works I will have a plan of attack for next year. I am a bit of a “hippie” in the sense that I won’t use chemicals in my plants or soil but if it’s not a pesticide I’ll give it a go.
 

MtViking

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@MtViking , I can commiserate on the grasshopper issue. This year they aren't bad, they all must be at your place :confused:. Here's a link to a product I've used with some success. The County extension pest guy told me I was wasting my money on this treatment, because they can vector in from far away, but I saw definite results. You can read up on Nosema Locustae, hopefully Planet Natural is not the only place that carries the bait. I'm sad to see they are closing.
Never mind I didn’t realize I just had to click on “link” hahah
 

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