Angora

JoieDeViveRabbitry

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:frow
I show and breed French Angora rabbits. I currently have 6, 3 does and 3 bucks in various colors that give me yummy wool and yarn colors...
I'm currently in LOVE with the oatmeal colored yarn I am getting from my broken fawn buck.
Anyone spinning some Angora?
 

Ninny

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I would love to have your bunnys! How hard are they to take care of?
 

JoieDeViveRabbitry

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Thank you :D
It really depends on the breed of Angora rabbit you have.
The English takes more work than the French because it's entire face is furnished, as well as it's legs and feet. The Giant would take longer than both of those because it's so large with a fully furnished face, etc...
The French has a clean face, very little ear tufting (if any, some don't), and no wool below the joint on the legs. This makes them easier to groom.

BUT you still must have time for them. My rabbits are groomed with slicker brushes and a blower everyday. It takes me about 30 minutes to blow and groom all 6 of my French Angoras IF they are in immaculate condition.
If they have lots of webbing or any matting, it's going to be more like 30 minutes for that one rabbit.
I am getting 5 Juniors ready for showing right now so they are being blown and groomed every single day and will be blown everyday until show day to keep their wool in pristine shape. You don't really need to blow out Angoras that won't be shown as long as you keep them very clean and brushed with a slicker but it is good for their skin and wool.

My daily rabbit chores for 10 rabbits take about an hour and then once a week all cages get taken apart, scrubbed, bleached, put back together... I did this today plus the usual feeding and the grooming... I think I spent about 2 hours in the barn today.
 

Ninny

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Thats not bad then. My bichons frises are worse. Would you recommand starting with babies or adults?
 

JoieDeViveRabbitry

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Ninny said:
Thats not bad then. My bichons frises are worse. Would you recommand starting with babies or adults?
Hmmm, they both have their pros and cons, you know?

I think it depends alot on whether you are interested in a "wooler" rabbit (one not for breeding and showing and just for hobby wool production), or a "show quality" rabbit.

If you want a showing/breeding bunny I would go with a young Jr. so that you can get the full experience of growing that rabbit up, training it for sitting in show position and being tolerant of grooming (though if you go with a rep. breeder they will start these things for you).

If you essentially just want wool to spin at the end of the day then I would go with an adult, maybe a nice senior buck (does don't usually make the best "pets" persay) who has been retired from a breeders program, etc.
 

Ninny

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I think at first just a wooler. Is there a big demand for them? They seem super hard to find.
 

JoieDeViveRabbitry

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There isn't really, though I think it's increasing, but I find the most easy to find are the English, followed by the white Giant, and then the French, with Satin and German tied for last...
I drove over 600 miles to get my 5 Jr.s last month.
I will have two litters in December, ready for new homes in Feb.
 

foxish

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Hi! I'm looking for a Satin Angora. I'm interested in spinning, my kids love rabbits, and OMG, they're just so pretty! How would you recommend looking for one to buy? I'd be fine with a retired shower, since he/she would already be trained to sit. What is it about retired bucks that make them not the best pets? Will they spray like a cat if not neutered? (She asked, feeling slightly ridiculous.)
 

ksalvagno

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Intact bucks can be aggressive. The buck may bite your children or yourself. You can always have a buck neutered. If you are looking for a pet, you could always look on Petfinder or other places. Most rescues spay and neuter their rabbits so all the vet work would be done and the adoption fee is usually low.
 

Ninny

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ksalvagno said:
Intact bucks can be aggressive. The buck may bite your children or yourself. You can always have a buck neutered. If you are looking for a pet, you could always look on Petfinder or other places. Most rescues spay and neuter their rabbits so all the vet work would be done and the adoption fee is usually low.
Ive looked at getting a rescue rabbit. But its seems like a huge pain just to get a bunny. Plus i want my rabbits to be outside and all the rescues ive looked at only adopt out if it will be a house bun.
 
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