Anti Chick Pick/Cream

DNRFarmstead

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In the last 3 days I have had 3 chickens succumb to being picked to death by their peers. The only reason has not been 4 deaths in 3 days is because I am currently doctoring a chicken i found only an hour ago. This is the first time I have ever had problems with my chickens literally eating each other. They have picked before but they have became literal carnivores. I thought if I got rid of the rooster that I thought was the cause things would stop but they havent. I am sure however that he was the root cause of all these shenanigans.



So, my question is, does anybody have a recipe for a homemade hot pick/anti pick spray or cream? I know that you can buy hot pick from Murray McMurray Hatchery but I feel like time is of the essence and if I can make something at home before more of my flock get picked to death then that would be fantastic.



Thank you in advance for your help.
 

Goat Whisperer

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You need to assess your flock and figure out why they are doing this to each other. Are they overcrowded? Do they have feed 24/7? Are they ranged or penned?

I know a lot of folks use the Blue Kote on their chickens. The thing is, the label says its not to be used on horses that are going to be used for food, so many chickens owners are worried about using it.

I would do something like this.
http://www.fresheggsdaily.com/2013/10/diy-anti-pick-antibacterial-blu-kote.html
 

Southern by choice

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Agree with @Goat Whisperer
How old are they? Are they in molt?

Calcium deficiency will also cause birds to pick at each other.
Do they have calcium grit available? (Oyster shell)

There is a honey paste you can make up that helps it also heals. Problem is if they dust bathe it is a nightmare.
 

Poka_Doodle

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You need to assess your flock and figure out why they are doing this to each other. Are they overcrowded? Do they have feed 24/7? Are they ranged or penned?

I know a lot of folks use the Blue Kote on their chickens. The thing is, the label says its not to be used on horses that are going to be used for food, so many chickens owners are worried about using it.

I would do something like this.
http://www.fresheggsdaily.com/2013/10/diy-anti-pick-antibacterial-blu-kote.html
Yeah, good point. There is likely a reason they are.
 

Latestarter

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Greetings @DNRFarmstead from the front range in Colorado. Welcome to BHY. Sorry this ordeal brought you here. If you haven't seen the sister site; Backyardchickens, there ya have it. There is a wealth of info available over there, more dedicated to chickens. There's also a link down below in my signature and in the side bar over there --->

I can and do use blukote on wounds... from whatever source or reason. I'm not concerned that it will affect the eggs in any way, shape or manner. Nor that years from now when I eat the bird that I'll die of blukote poisoning. I use the spray but it is also offered in ointment form and I believe also in powder form. Be careful when you spray it as it does stain and will take some time to wear off your skin and will NOT wash out of clothing. I have had very good experience with this and keeping other birds from pecking at wounds where it's been sprayed. You will have to keep an eye on it though as the wounded bird might pick that area herself as it heals, much like a child picking scabs off a scratch because it itches. So often I've had to re-apply over time.

If it's a larger "open" wound or long cut, I use a salve/ointment called EMT Gel by Lambert Kay. It's natural hydrolysate of colligen and is remarkable stuff. It essentially helps the wound grow new skin. A lot of front line hospitals are using this same stuff on humans.

In my experience, there are one or two birds who start the whole thing. Once it's started and there's blood, then others get in on the act... a case of taking advantage of what's available more than anything else... if no blood, they wouldn't be involved in the first place. If you can get out there and watch as they come down from the roost and can stay and watch for a bit, you should be able to see which one is the instigator and remove that one from the flock. I'm not talking pecking order squabbles or best spot at the feed trough. You'll be able to tell the difference.

If it's already started and there are multiple birds in on it, move in and get them all to scatter then step back and become part of the landscape and watch. The first bird back in to eat is normally the one you'll want gone. But don't interfere immediately... as I said, there may be more than one. See how quickly #2 shows up to join the new feast.

I'm sorry I can't be of more help. I hope you can single out the one starting it and remove them.
 

Southern by choice

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@Latestarter is right find the instigator... but I still go back to the CAUSE. We were a big poultry farm before goats. We have had thousands of birds. I can count on one hand how many birds have pecked... those were young birds that were fixated on those new feathers coming in at the 4 week stage... other than that nothing.
At one time we bred 17 different varieties... and we have not seen a particular breed issue either. We have had over 40 varieties but didn't breed them all.

Overcrowding, penned, deficient, mite infested, and hungry birds will peck.
Solve those issues and you should not have any problems.

I do hope your birds heal up soon.
 

chiques chicks

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There is a reason they are pecking. Overcrowding, parasites, etc. Tear the wounds as described, and find what is causing it.

Has there been a change in flock dynamics like new birds disrupting the pecking order? It's called a pecking order for a reason. Once there is blood, others will peck at the red., the reason I use blukote, it isn't red.
 

kccjer

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Pine Tar. It's an old-timer remedy and works like a charm. You also don't have to apply it every few hours. Use gloves unless you want pine tar fingers for a couple days. Should be able to find a can of it at your feed store and it's not too expensive. You can also put red lights up. If everything is red, it tends to stop them from pecking.
 
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