Any tips to convince parents?

Junior

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I’ve wanted a goat for awhile now but don’t know how to ask my parents for one. Is there any tips you’ve got to help me?

I’m a good, hardworking student and I’ve had many pets that I’ve cared for. I don’t tire of animals easy (unlike my sibling, I usually have to look after theirs as well) so it’s not as if I’ll look after it for a few months than make my parents look after it.

We used to have a goat when I was little but he passed away and haven’t gotten one since. We have plenty of space for it to run around and have sheep and a horse for it to socialise with.
 

Baymule

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Study up on breeds, educate yourself so that you can present a well thought out reason for getting another goat.
 

Junior

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@Alaskan
Thanks for the tips. When I move out I already know that I’m taking the rest of my animals with me. This includes a (very loud) rainbow lorikeet and a pony. Also, I know that once we get it everyone will like it. This happened once when my dad brought a dog even though mum didn’t want one. He soon became her favourite pet. I suppose the saying it’s better to ask for forgiveness than permission comes true inmost cases
 

Junior

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@Baymule
I’ve done plenty of research over the last few years and have even decided on a few types of goat that‘s best for me. I’m trying to convince my sister to help me convince dad then we can team up to convince mum. Our other goat was a pain in the neck so with a bad experience I wouldn’t blame them for saying no.

I just feel I’m up for the challenge of looking after one. I’ve raised a sheep before and I know they ain’t a goat but it was a good experience. I’ve also hatched and raised an assortment of birds but I want something bigger to call mine and to look after
 

promiseacres

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Also even pet goats need a herd mate, so 1 goat is really 2 goats. And just because you're dad got away with a new pet, in my household the kids would not. It may be better for all if you wait until you are on your own if your Mom is adamant about it.
 

Childwanderer

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Maybe you could ease them into goats by starting with raising a kid for show or market. I don’t know anything about those livestock niches, but the built-in end date might overcome some of your parents’ hesitation while giving you another chance to demonstrate a positive experience with goat(s).
 

messybun

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My family would tell me to do the math. Figure out feed budget, shelter, vet bills. Assume it won’t get along with your other animals and may need a separate pen. Determine your agricultural units, and land that you have. Also, determine the animals’ usefulness above and beyond just you want it. I don’t know your parents, but with mine at least, don’t whine if you want something. Try a structured argument, if they say no ask for the specific reasons why not. You may be able to come back later with counter points. You may not get the goats. If you want to convince them to get goats I suggest you set yourself up for not getting them. If goats aren’t the be all to end all then even if they say no you will be disappointed, but taking a disappointment well (genuinely, don’t fake it) will show maturity.
As a last note, writing your desire, plan, budget, basic information, and back up plan if all goes wrong in a well developed essay will get you a little extra notice. It will show you thought this out well, are willing to put the time in, and it will show that you pay attention in school.
 

Beekissed

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If it's a milking breed, that's a good bargaining point. Breed it to a meat breed so you can produce both milk and meat from the same goat and it's no longer a pet...now it's food production and paying for its own feed. Goat sales aren't as good as sheep right now but close enough.

Determine that you will keep overhead down by utilizing mostly pasture for feed and building anything that needs built out of repurposed lumber....tons of that to be found if you just keep your eyes open, especially in towns. I've found all kinds of excellent, new lumber set out with the trash. Pallets are also good material and useful for so many things on a farm, so picking those up for free will help as well.

Also, inform the 'rents that, at any time during goat ownership, that they feel you aren't taking care of your responsibility, the goats can be sold just as easily as they were bought, no harm, no foul.

Collect garden leftovers from neighbors and friends for additional feed, as well as pumpkins and gourds in the fall.....I saw a neat thing on FB the other day where they have a thing for each state called "Gourds for Goats" wherein you could sign up and be the recipient of excess pumpkins and such from commercial and private growers. All of these are great feed for goats.
 

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