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Bee honey on tap? Easy honey extraction?

Discussion in 'Everything Else Bees' started by Nifty, Feb 16, 2015.

  1. Feb 16, 2015
    Nifty

    Nifty Herd Master Administrator

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    I wonder if this is legit?

     
  2. Feb 17, 2015
    Latestarter

    Latestarter Novice; "Practicing" Animal Husbandry Golden Herd Member

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    Interesting concept. Even if it did/does work, not sure I'd want to use it... All my neighbors would be coming by after sun down to fill their honey jars. Not easy for them to do that the current way.
     
  3. Feb 17, 2015
    greybeard

    greybeard Herd Master Golden Herd Member

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    I posted the same thing a little earlier in the hive section. Most beekeepers I've talked to have their doubts about the whole thing--appears to be from someone in Australia or New Zealand, but according to the comments under the video, some kind of patent has been applied for.
    I cannot imagine a tap somehow being open all the time--every bee, wasp, yellow jacket, coon and skunk in 10 miles around would be robbing it fast as it flowed out--not to mention the dust and other undesirable junk blowing in the wind.
    I do sometimes donate to crowdfunding requests but I think I'll pass on this one.

    A little more info is coming out bit by bit--again I have NOTHING do with this--connected to it in no way, nor am I encouraging anyone to contribute to the endeavor or purchase anything from the makers of this 'invention":

     
    Last edited: Feb 17, 2015
  4. Mar 3, 2015
    Nifty

    Nifty Herd Master Administrator

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  5. Mar 4, 2015
    Happy Chooks

    Happy Chooks Loving the herd life

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    I still don't see how you can tell the cells are capped and ready to extract without opening the hive.
     
    Latestarter likes this.
  6. Mar 5, 2015
    Nifty

    Nifty Herd Master Administrator

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    Good question!

    It sure will be interesting once they are produced and people start using them... I'm sure of the 4,000+ people who have already signed up to get one, a bunch will post their feedback, videos, etc.
     
  7. Mar 5, 2015
    babsbag

    babsbag Herd Master

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    Looks like they met their goal and then some. Good for them and if the thing works I will start saving my pennies and buy one too.

    Looking at the pictures of the hive and how they have cut the ends open I would be concerned about how the bees are going to protect that big of an opening. The frames had better fit dead tight against the ends of those boxes and we all know that bees can fit into pretty small spaces. Maybe I am just missing something.


    [​IMG]
     
    Last edited: Mar 5, 2015
  8. Feb 4, 2016
    Bruce

    Bruce Herd Master Golden Herd Member

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    I read up on them about a month ago and watched their videos. Other than the expense they seem like the cat's meow for collecting the honey.

    The picture shows their Flow frame in a specially designed box, there is a wood "filler" piece that would normally be in place and the plexiglass (or whatever the window is made of) would be covered. You can see glare on that window and a twist latch on the left side that would hold the left side of the cover closed when installed. The window is there so you can do some visual inspection of the comb without opening the box.

    1) each "frame" is 2 sides of a nearly complete comb with a narrow vertical gap between them. The bees fill in that space to complete the cells.
    2) when it is time to get the honey, you "split" the comb vertically (one side moves up, the other down) by inserting a crank handle at the top and the honey drains down to the bottom and out through a tube you insert into that hole at the bottom that you can see is capped in the picture. Once drained, you reverse crank to realign the comb sides.
    3) you DO NOT just tap off some honey. You wait until that "frame" is totally full and drain it all.
    4) you can drop these into an existing Langstroth super and can pull the frames to check them as you would a traditional frame.
    5) These are just for the supers, you still have to have the lower boxes for the queen and brood and you still have to maintain them just as you would a hive where you pull the frames to get the honey out (crush or extract).

    Benefits:
    1. Much easier extraction
    2. No ripping the super apart to extract the honey, much less stress on the bees (of course if you put it in an existing Langstroth and don't drill holes for the crank and tube, you would have to pull the hive apart to pull the frame to drain it)
    3. Much less "bee resource" needed to build the "comb"
    Downsides:
    1. Expensive
    2. No wax comb if you want that
    Bear in mind that I do not now and never have had bees, just investigating. Thus I can only pass on what I have "learned". If I remember correctly, the Australian son & father developers have been working on this concept for 10 years, multiple prototypes with their bee operation. They did crowd funding last winter/spring to get the capital to produce them commercially and started shipping in the last few months.
     
    Last edited: Feb 4, 2016
  9. Feb 8, 2016
    Happy Chooks

    Happy Chooks Loving the herd life

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    More downsides as I see it:

    Moveable parts that can break
    After the honey drains out, does it close securely?
     
  10. Feb 10, 2016
    mikiz

    mikiz Loving the herd life

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    What happens if the bees decide they want to put eggs in the frames instead?