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  1. Mar 7, 2019
    Mike CHS

    Mike CHS Herd Master Golden Herd Member

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    I noticed on the Premier1 site, they are now listing the Bioworma product along with prices but not in stock. I'm guessing they will start carrying it when it's available.

    If you haven't heard about this new product, I'm pasting a description from the Premier1 product info:

    New! A feed supplement to control the spread of parasitic larvae in the pasture. Livamol® with BioWorma® contains a naturally occurring fungus that captures and consumes infective worm larvae (including chemical and anthelmintic resistant larvae) within the manure of grazing animals. BioWorma® is effective when fed to sheep, goats, cattle, horses and others—including deer, alpacas and zoo animals.

    Note: BioWorma® eliminates larvae from the pasture, reducing the possibility of reinfection. It does not eliminate parasites present in the animal. Animals need to be treated with a dewormer to remove the internal parasites.
     
  2. Mar 7, 2019
    frustratedearthmother

    frustratedearthmother Herd Master

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    Awesome! I'll line up to be their first customer!
     
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  3. Mar 7, 2019
    Baymule

    Baymule Herd Master

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    Sounds great!
     
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  4. Mar 8, 2019
    greybeard

    greybeard Herd Master

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    https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0304401718302577

    My only concern would be the time period that it takes for control to show up in any significance.
    Horses:
    The overall mean larval count for the BioWorma treated faeces over the eight week observation period was significantly reduced compared to the Control faeces (Table 4), with mean values of 2248 larvae for the Control samples compared with only 363 larvae for the BioWorma treated samples, a reduction of 84% (P = 0.004). Variability was marked across the trials but a significant difference was also observed at six weeks post treatment. ( (Table 4).)

    Cattle:
    The overall mean larval count for the control samples over the eight week period for the BioWorma treated faeces was significantly reduced compared to the Control faeces (Table 5), with mean values of 16,038 larvae for the Control faeces compared to 3059 larvae for the BioWorma treated samples, a reduction of 81% (P = 0.006). Variability was marked across the trials but a significant difference was also seen at eight weeks post treatment (Table 5).

    Goats:
    Variability was marked by week but the overall mean larval count for the BioWorma faeces over the eight week period was significantly reduced compared to the Control faeces (Table 6) with mean values of 12,866 larvae for the Control faeces compared with only 1834 larvae after BioWorma treatment, a reduction of 86% (P = 0.01).

    All trials combined:
    Fig. 1, Fig. 2, Fig. 3 show that in most cases the larval numbers reached a maximum (typically at week 6) and then declined. Comparison of the mean numbers of parasitic larvae found on the herbage samples surrounding the Control and BioWorma faecal pats over the 8-week period allowed the calculation of the degree of reduction in pasture larval burden due to use of the test product. These values are summarised in Table 7. For each species of animal, substantial reductions were seen in each trial at each trial site, except for the Nimmitabel site of goat trial 1, where unseasonable freezing conditions were experienced shortly after the placement of the samples onto the pasture.

    The difference in pasture larval counts between the groups demonstrated the ability of BioWorma to prevent the emergence of infectious larvae from the faeces of horses, cattle and goats onto the pasture. Average percent reduction (%) in larval numbers on pasture across all trials for horses, cattle and goats were 84%, 81% and 86% respectively (Table 4, Table 5, Table 6).