Boer Kid Not Herself - Fast Heart Rate

smoknz28

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NOTE: I mean Respirations in all.


Our kid has been very active. Jumping and running around everywhere. So lively.

She's about 3-weeks old.

Yesterday, after her bottle feeding....she pretty much came to a halt. She wasn't running around and she just wasn't herself.

This morning my daughter went out to feed her and she only drank maybe 4-oz of her feeding....and she has a high heart rate. I'd say for every second....she's breathing 3-4 breaths and she really just wants to lay. Doesn't want to be active.

Vaccinations.... We bought these goats from a local breeder who told me he's already vaccinated her. I am relatively still a new goat owner and didn't know what to ask as far as what he'd administered on her. Since, we have owned her for 2-weeks. We have not administered any vaccines ourselves on her.

Feeding.... We were feeding her a mix of whole milk, condensed milk and buttermilk. It was getting too expensive and we opted to change over to MannaPro Kid Milk. We changed over to it around 4-days ago.

We also have another kid that we bought the same time....and he's not having any issues. We are feeding him the same. Matter of fact....he's outside now jumping and running around like she use to.

I am afraid she cNt sustain this high heart rate much longer and she will pass.

Any ideas here....?

Thank you all!
 
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woodsie

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how are her poops? temp?I would just give homo milk with some probiotics or full-fat plain yogurt mixed in. lots of people have troubles with kid milk replacer and find regular milk is much easier on their tummies, you don't need the condensed milk with is the pricey part.

I would also be concerned about cocci in kids...and be starting treatment/prevention.
 

smoknz28

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how are her poops? temp?I would just give homo milk with some probiotics or full-fat plain yogurt mixed in. lots of people have troubles with kid milk replacer and find regular milk is much easier on their tummies, you don't need the condensed milk with is the pricey part.

I would also be concerned about cocci in kids...and be starting treatment/prevention.
Thank you for the response.

What I've learned so far from Vets I've talked to is...check temperature. If it's high...look I it starting LA 200 or tetracycline.

We are away from the house now and have not checked her stool, but with her rear looking a bit messy as in she's probably had diahria (spelling). When we get back to the house, we'll check.

I need to stop by TSC to pick a thermometer and meds.
 

woodsie

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Yup, while you are there get the prevention cocci additive.

Taken from Fiasco Farms website:

"After some research, I found that, though many people use Corid (amprolium), but it dose not work as well as Sulmet (sodium sulfamethazine) or Albon (sulfadimethoxine). I decided to try Sulmet 12.5% Solution, a liquid, that is usually put in the drinking water (it was cheaper than Albon). It cost $8 a bottle (16 oz) at the Co-op. Instead of putting it in drinking water. Starting at three weeks of age,, we gave this to our kids orally, with the proper dose per weight (scroll down for more details) every three weeks until they were 3 months old. We also treated them any time we saw runny poops. We were pleased to see the growth on our kids increase. They all around seemed healthier.

After a little more research and speaking with other breeders I decided to switch to Albon (sulfadimethoxine) because it works even better than Sulmet. The Albon 12.5% Solution does not come in a 16 oz. bottle and only comes in 1 gallon. The gallon cost $54, but when you take into account that you won't have vet bills and sick kids, for the amount of goats we have, it was worth getting (ordered for PBS Livestock or Jeffer's - see the suppliers page). I bought the gallon and then another goat friend bought half of it from me. The gallon I have now is the one I bought last year, and will last this whole year, so in the end, it will only have cost me about $15 to treat the whole kid crop this year; well worth this small expense. Di-Methoox Concentrated Solution 12.5% is exactly the same thing as Albon Concentrated Solution 12.5% but is cheaper."

She likely has cocci or will get it soon as she is already stressed...she is at the age where it starts to show up and sometimes you have very little time to treat, better to stay ahead of cocci than let it be a big problem.

Keep us posted!
 

woodsie

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I have also had good luck with this recipe in treating scours and buying time against the cocci bug. Worth making even if you don't have the slippery elm although it coats the tummy and settles it, but the other herbs in the tea stop the diarrhea...it really does work.

You can try: 1 tea. slippery elm, 1 tea. ginger, 1 tea. cinnamon, 1/2tea. clove....steep in 1 cup boiled water for 20 min. offer kid 6 cc (cooled) every few hours till scours stop...
 

smoknz28

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Thank you all.

Got her temperature checked and she came in at 104.4.

I administered LA200 (.07 ml) with a 18x1" needle. From TSC, it was recommended for me to use this needle on my kid....however, after seeing the thickness of the needle and looking at the size of my kid....I think this width of a needle is too much for her. I still administered, but think I'll be heading back to TSC tomorrow to pick up thinner needles for her.

I'm near 100% she has pneumonia. She still breathing fast and seems to be with short breaths. She's also coughing quite a bit.

I've had pneumonia before and know it's no joke. I nearly died from it and I was only 18 years old.

Any other recommendations at this point other than what's been offered?

What size needles should I pick up?

Thank you all....she's hanging in there.
 

woodsie

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oh that temp is telling isn't it....sounds like you are on the right course. not sure on the needle size, I would think smaller would be easier, goats are pretty sensitive with injections.
 

smoknz28

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oh that temp is telling isn't it....sounds like you are on the right course. not sure on the needle size, I would think smaller would be easier, goats are pretty sensitive with injections.
Yes.... When I injected her...I could tell it hurt her pretty good....so this needle size I think will only be used for my adult goats for CD/T.

I'm not noticing diarrhea around... With the coughing though...I think we're on the right track of pneumonia.
 

smoknz28

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Today.....we laid "Polly" to rest....

Sad day for us this afternoon as our kid didn't make it and died in my daughters arms.

Thank you to all responded in your efforts to help us.
 

babsbag

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So sorry you lost your baby, it is hard. I just treated one for pneumonia too, it is actually fairly common in kids.

It seems that we never have the drugs on hand when we need them. I have gotten better with that over time but if you are going to own goats you need to always take the temp as soon as you see them "off" in any way. Goats have a very high metabolism and can go down fast.

You said you gave .07ML , I hope you meant .7 ML as in almost 1. The dosage is 3ml (cc) per 100 lbs. and I would rather overdose than under dose a sick kid. Another drug to ask you vet for is Banamine. It is an anti-inflammatory and will bring down the fever and if pneumonia can help them breathe a little easier. But sometimes no matter what we do it isn't meant to be.

Just remember with goats to treat aggressively and watch them and observer their daily routine. Know your goats, their odd behavior is usually your first indicator that something is wrong.

And as far as vaccines...the first ones are given at 3-4 weeks and then again a month later. It is called CDT and you can get it at Tractor Supply. It would not have helped with pneumonia.

:hugs
 
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