Boots or shoes specifically for step in posts

ajmrzf

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Hello! I've searched posts on work boots, and I'll be looking into the various recommendations made on other threads.

I wanted to see if any of you who use the electric netting/step-in posts (such as those offered by Premier 1) have found a boot that will hold up to daily fence rotation. I destroyed a pair of Bog ankle rain boots in less than 3 months doing this task... 😬I'm hoping to find a pair that is durable with a thick sole, waterproof (that wet grass, y'all! 🌾🏊‍♀️🌿), and ankle or shin height. I also loved that the Bogs were slip on, but I'd let go of that wish list item for something that lasted 2-3+ years. My soil is relatively rocky and we have very hard dirt in the dry season, so I'm often stomping at least a few of the posts into the ground. Anyone find a good shoe for this? Thanks!
 

Alasgun

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A small post pounder like you’d use on T post would be very easy to make AND would prolong the life of your shoes.
 

Beekissed

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Actual, lug sole, steel toe work boots are your best option. And you could also expand your grazing area so you can move your paddocks less frequently....say 2-4 day rotations. Could save you time and footwear as well.
 

ajmrzf

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A small post pounder like you’d use on T post would be very easy to make AND would prolong the life of your shoes.
Thanks. I've tried a rubber mallet, and it makes the chore take much longer than stepping (or stomping) them in the ground.
 

ajmrzf

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Actual, lug sole, steel toe work boots are your best option. And you could also expand your grazing area so you can move your paddocks less frequently....say 2-4 day rotations. Could save you time and footwear as well.
Thank you. I'll add those terms to my search.

I'm working toward a 2-4 day rotation, just not there yet. I have another netted fence on the way to at least get me to every other day. All in good time. It has taken 3 tries to find the fencing that my sheep won't challenge, so I'm slowly building up my supply of those now that I've found what works.
 

misfitmorgan

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Thank you. I'll add those terms to my search.

I'm working toward a 2-4 day rotation, just not there yet. I have another netted fence on the way to at least get me to every other day. All in good time. It has taken 3 tries to find the fencing that my sheep won't challenge, so I'm slowly building up my supply of those now that I've found what works.
Be carful...our sheep didn't challenge the premier nets for over a year. Now we have 660ft of sheep net that is useless to us. They found if they just run thru it fast most of them dont get shocked. We even tried using T-posts to string it up tighter...no dice.
 

ajmrzf

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That happened here, too actually. I started with poultry netting, and they would go under it. Then sheep netting. They jumped over it or through it. Now we're onto the tallest goat netting. So far so good. Now mine only challenge the fence when they get startled or if they think the food within the fence is gone - which is why I was moving it every day, regardless of what forage was left. If I see one eyeballing the other side, I'll clap really loudly at them. For some reason, that startles them enough to not try it.

Do you use another type of fence to rotate now?

I got leather steel toe lug sole Ariat boots. I can't comment on longevity, but they make easier work of stepping in posts.
 

misfitmorgan

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That happened here, too actually. I started with poultry netting, and they would go under it. Then sheep netting. They jumped over it or through it. Now we're onto the tallest goat netting. So far so good. Now mine only challenge the fence when they get startled or if they think the food within the fence is gone - which is why I was moving it every day, regardless of what forage was left. If I see one eyeballing the other side, I'll clap really loudly at them. For some reason, that startles them enough to not try it.

Do you use another type of fence to rotate now?

I got leather steel toe lug sole Ariat boots. I can't comment on longevity, but they make easier work of stepping in posts.
We don't rotate now which really sucks for the sheep. They could be on green pasture all summer and spring if we could trust them in the net fence. Instead we are juts building permanent pastures to rotate the sheep, goats and cows thru on our property. Until this year they all went to a 8 acre fenced pasture at our friends house for the spring, summer and fall then were drylotted for winter at our place.
 

ajmrzf

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We don't rotate now which really sucks for the sheep. They could be on green pasture all summer and spring if we could trust them in the net fence. Instead we are juts building permanent pastures to rotate the sheep, goats and cows thru on our property. Until this year they all went to a 8 acre fenced pasture at our friends house for the spring, summer and fall then were drylotted for winter at our place.
Nice that you have that option though! We just have the one pasture, plus a few rough silvopasture-y-ish areas to rotate them on. If I don't force them out to the back of the field with netted fences, they just stick to the front and mow it like a lawn. Meanwhile, lush forage goes to waste in the back, and their worm load increases I'm sure!

My ram is my main fence challenger, and I'm half tempted to pull a Greg Judy and shoot him in front of all of his friends if he challenges the fence for no apparent reason again. He's already destined for freezer camp, so no love lost. I see Greg Judy and other YT farmers raise sheep on 1-3 strands. I tried that, too. By the time I got up to 6 strands and they just casually walked thru it, I gave up. 😆😑 We're on solar though, so that's probably why.
 

misfitmorgan

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The 8acre pasture is no longer an option as our friend has not gotten cows that need his pasture. The pasture we are making at our house is a heck of a struggle....we are literally making it. Our 12acres was clear cut some number of years ago before we owned it, they left all the trash and stumps they didnt want. In place of the trees grew a "forest" of brush, populars, birch, pines, autumn olive, etc....trash plants all 3" or less in diameter and so thick you cant see thru them. So we have had to rent a machine for $350/day to clear 20' lanes to be able to put up fence....each day rental gets us one pasture. Atm the goats are in the first pasture and busy stripping bark and knocking over the brush to eat all the leaves. They are doing a good job in just 2 weeks we can see thru the brush to the property line an acre away. Before this even in winter with no leaves you couldnt see the property line from the ground. We are working on setting up to rent the machine to clear another set of lanes for the next hopefully 2 pastures. Once they are fenced the goats will move into one and the sheep into the other, then the pigs will go into the current one to finish rutting everything up. Then we will burn the pasture, rake and level it then seed it.

Its one heck of a process to make some pasture.....because we can no longer use electric net or our friends pasture....it will be worth it though in the end.
 
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