Boots or shoes specifically for step in posts

ajmrzf

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Whew! That is quite the process. It's amazing what animals can do to help the process along. I've just discovered my sheep eat poison ivy like they're goats. Time to put them to work!
 

misfitmorgan

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Oh yes sheep and goats both love poison ivy! Animals doing the majority of the work for our pasture project is what makes it possible, we wouldnt be able to afford the machine rental to clear 10 acres of brush/small trees otherwise. We did request a controlled burn of our 10 acres if we cleared a 25' fireline all the way around it but got denied because we are next to 100s of acres of mature woods. Oddly they did a controlled burned two weeks ago in 100s of acres of woods on goberment land. Go firgure lol. To be fair though it did get out of hand and they had to evacuated 3,000 people for 2 days.

Anyhow I'm glad you found some shoes that will hopefully hold up for you.
 

Legamin

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Hello! I've searched posts on work boots, and I'll be looking into the various recommendations made on other threads.

I wanted to see if any of you who use the electric netting/step-in posts (such as those offered by Premier 1) have found a boot that will hold up to daily fence rotation. I destroyed a pair of Bog ankle rain boots in less than 3 months doing this task... 😬I'm hoping to find a pair that is durable with a thick sole, waterproof (that wet grass, y'all! 🌾🏊‍♀️🌿), and ankle or shin height. I also loved that the Bogs were slip on, but I'd let go of that wish list item for something that lasted 2-3+ years. My soil is relatively rocky and we have very hard dirt in the dry season, so I'm often stomping at least a few of the posts into the ground. Anyone find a good shoe for this? Thanks!
When all else fails go with what you know..so that’s what I’m going to suggest…what I know. I have been retired from the Army for 30 years now +/- but I remember clearly two things I did that got me through the coldest times in some of the most God forsaken countries (landscapes) on this earth. Army boots over constantly dry wool socks. Yes I wore the arctic boots for extreme weather but they will not hold up to the fence posts. But the regular leather and vibram(R) soled Army Boot Standard ($20 at your area surplus store) will take years and years of abuse in hot and cold weather as long as you buy them one size large and put heavy wool socks on and keep them dry. Since I wore mine everyday I had two pairs…they need to breath and dry after a day’s use! (REALLY!) they take minimal maintenance and can last…well…40 or more years. Twice annual mink oil rub and weekly polishing and they never wear out. They will pop those tiny Premier One electric netting fence posts in (of which I have hundreds to do daily) and your feet will never feel abused.
There may be a better shoe for it. I’ve never tried anything else. They are incredibly comfortable! I stick with what has worked for me for over 40 years. Good luck! Happy hunting!
 

Legamin

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Oh yes sheep and goats both love poison ivy! Animals doing the majority of the work for our pasture project is what makes it possible, we wouldnt be able to afford the machine rental to clear 10 acres of brush/small trees otherwise. We did request a controlled burn of our 10 acres if we cleared a 25' fireline all the way around it but got denied because we are next to 100s of acres of mature woods. Oddly they did a controlled burned two weeks ago in 100s of acres of woods on goberment land. Go firgure lol. To be fair though it did get out of hand and they had to evacuated 3,000 people for 2 days.

Anyhow I'm glad you found some shoes that will hopefully hold up for you.
We had a growing patch of nettles that was getting out of control. I moved out the sheep and moved in the goats…it took three days and they never once complained. I do not know what armor plating is in their mouth (and the other end) or what highly erosive acid they carry in their stomach but there is not weed that is a match for them if you can get them to eat it. My only failure is napweed….they hate it…they will starve before they will touch it.
 
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