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Breeding problem with Kunekune

Discussion in 'Breeds & Breeding - Pigs' started by BarnyardBlast, Jun 30, 2017.

  1. Jun 30, 2017
    BarnyardBlast

    BarnyardBlast Chillin' with the herd

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    We purchased a breeding pair of kunekune last spring. The sow had been previously bred (to a different pig) and arrived pregnant. She delivered piglets without a problem. She had five but only two have lived to be a year old (both females). I was told the male was proven. Our proven sow has not become pregnant again. We purchased a second sow from a different breeder. She hasn't become pregnant either.

    This is our first venture into pigs and we selected this breed as they are considered easy to handle (and they are friendly). I'm wondering if I'm doing something wrong? Would over-feeding cause a male to become sterile? The first pair was kept together but we put the second female in an adjoining area for a couple of months before moving her in with the first two. I'm about to switch those two out for the two females that our first one had to see if there is any luck there.

    Should I have separated the female pig after breeding rather than keeping her in with the male? I have not tracked heat cycles for any of the females yet. At this point I have four kune females and one kune male. (I have one other female pig of unknown origin that my husband took in after the owners decided she was no longer 'cute'). They have plenty of room and shelter. They graze but also eat feed pellets. They occasionally (a few times a week) receive bread, eggs, fruit or other items.

    We have had the first pair for a year, so I'm becoming impatient. Any suggestions?
     
  2. Jun 30, 2017
    frustratedearthmother

    frustratedearthmother Herd Master

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    I'm not a pig expert for sure, but an overweight boar might not be able to physically get himself up on the sows.