Calf wants to play with me

fredcat

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A old fishing pole with a plastic flag on end of it works good wouldn't think ball good ideal
 

JimLad

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I had a hand raised, Holstein steer that was the same way. I just paid no heed and he grew out of it. Was a sight to see him gallop across the field to greet me, though.
I kept the gate between us until the excitement died down.
Loved the guy.
 

Beekissed

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When she does that, advance towards her with arms spread wide and concentrate on making her back up....keep up pressure until she does. Just as soon as she backs up, drop your arms. If she goes back to head down and bouncing, back her up with the "big" posture. Most animals hate that "big" posture and see it as a threat, even great white sharks. Want them close, stay small, want them far, show big.

After she learns the pressure is released by backing up or changing her posture, she will respond to big arms for any time you want her to move or stay back. Teach the kids the same thing, she will need to respect their space also. Want her near, small stance, want her to get back, big stance. No need to smack a calf that small when she's young enough to learn hand signals.
 

Jesusfreak101

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So i posted on my other thread about this so,sorry if you reread about this. But yesterday as i was feeding the calf i noticed that she had lice, was also anemic. So treating her for lice and anemia. Also worming her. Just to cover it all
 

Ridgetop

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You absolutely need to teach your calf manners NOW. Even in a couple months she can hurt you by playing. The first step in teaching her manners is to halter break her. You need to buy a properly fitting "newborn' size leAther calf halter. The halter you have is probably too big. The halters sold as "calf halters" are designed for 600 + calves. It is way too big for your calf. Your calf is only 3 months old. She looks like a Jersey. Jersey cattle are much smaller than Holsteins or even Angus. Your calf needs a "newborn" calf halter with a chain shank and a leather lead. The chain shank and leather lead are all one piece and clip onto the halter. I bought mine 30 years ago from Jeffers and still use them. We also used it on our large Hampshire ram when showing him. Several years ago I couldn't find my "newborn" calf halters and I tried to buy another for our rams, but I couldn't find any. I ended up buying a "large ram halter". It was leather and had a chain shank. When it arrived it was exactly the same as the "newborn calf" halter! If you can't find the leather "newborn" calf halter buy the large ram halter. These halters are adjustable and if you need to you can punch more holes.
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The reason I recommend the halter with the metal shank is that the metal shank gives you more control over the calf. Just because she is cute and playful now does not mean that you cant teach her manners. Later, when she is completely trained, you can try a rope halter, although I prefer a leather halter with a chain shank when leading cattle. With a chain shank, even a small woman or child can lead the cow.

We raised veal calves for years and my kids showed them at the Fair. First, you have to get them used to wearing the halter. you put it on when they are drinking their bottle and then lead them with the bottle, They will follow the bottle. You must teach cattle to lead with their heads up because they have less ability to butt when their heads are up in the air. Another reason for a chain shank under the chin. Do not let her twist her head down because you will have no control over her even in a halter with her head down. Once your calf is walking well on the halter, I suggest you put it on her every time you go in her pen so you will have control over her. If she is too boisterous, put it on her from outside the pen when you go to feed her bottle.

Tie your calf with her head up to a post for about 15 minutes at a time several times a day. DO NOT LEAVE HER ALONE! You cannot leave a young calf tied up without supervision. They will often collapse and just hang there so you have to be able to get to them and release the tied lead of they do. You cant keep them tied for more than 15 minutes at a time at 3 months old since they get tired. I have seen 3 month old veal calves get tired while walking around the show ring and just lay down! :lol: Their owners frantically try to get them up and the calf won't move. It just collapses. Those young owners usually got their calf out of its stall and worked it too much before going into the ring and tired it out. Fun for the audience, humiliating for the child. Often the judge would have to come over and help by twisting its tail as the owner pulled on the halter.

When your calf is older, she may decide she doesn't want to obey you in the halter. This is when you can use another trick Put the halter on her but substitute a stud chain and lead rope for the chain shank and leather lead. Cut the lead rope off so that it hangs down and trails on the ground unless the calf holds her head up. Leave this on her all the time. She will learn that she has to keep her head up when she walks in order to avoid stepping n the lead rope and yanking on her halter, She will self train to keep her head up when walking. This is a trick some beef leaders used to help their project kids train their beef steers to walk with their heads up without always having to jerk on the chain. It also teaches them to stand still when they step on the rope. This will be helpful when you want her to stand still and you give a jerk to the shank.

The hardest thing to remember when raising any animal on a bottle is that you need to train them from the first sip of milk that they cannot jump on you or butt you. It is hard to do because they are so adorable and trusting. Remember you have to look ahead to their grown size and train them in advance. I had some project kids with badly behaved older animals because they thought the babies were cute when they jumped on them like puppies and then the animals grew up. One child got hurt when another child's untrained goat butted it full strength and knocked it down. At that point being sorry just doesn't help.

Always remember that these animals are livestock even though you are cute and you love them. Training them is very important because it will keep you and your children safe when handling them. Even foals that are imprint trained, have to be taught manners.

Hope this helps.
 

Jesusfreak101

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Uh no she not a jersey and the halter fits she was just at a bad angle in that picture. She a charolais calf. We been training every morning with the lead. So far she behaves. She not so space invader now that she been learning not to get in my space.
 

Jesusfreak101

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We plan to breed her and her sister(her twin on mom) and have the produce meat calves for us. I want her friendly so it easier to handle her if she need help birthing or other medical. I also been cleaning her hoofs incase they ever need work later . One of the reasons I am feel very strongly about her needing manner if she were to even show a slightly aggressive habit when older she going in the freezer. I won't let and aggressive animal stay. Even the gander knows his place.
 

Ridgetop

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I agree with you. Too many people have a Disney attitude about farm animals. They are livestock and we need to remember that when raising them and teaching them manners. People that have never been up close to livestock don't realize how powerful and dangerous they can be. Training both your calves is a good idea. Even the one with her mama can be halter broke. Is mama halter broke? If so, putting the calf on a halter and leading her along with mama would be an easy way to train her. Lucky those were twin heifer calves too. M/F twins are usually sterile. Once you get the heifers trained your kids can always take them to the fair and show them if they want.
 
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