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Can I leave my buck with a pregnant doe?

Discussion in 'Birthing, Weaning and Raising Young Rabbits' started by BunnyBoxHop, Apr 5, 2018.

  1. Apr 5, 2018
    Tale of Tails Rabbitry

    Tale of Tails Rabbitry Loving the herd life

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    Most of the movements I have felt are on the lower sides. As to calming a rabbit to accept touching, that is a process. Treats of edible greens might help, but generally you just have to get them used to it.

    However, you do not have to do this at all, just assume she is pregnant counting from the day they were first put together.
     
    BunnyBoxHop likes this.
  2. Oct 30, 2018
    Ron Bequeath

    Ron Bequeath Chillin' with the herd

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    I'm sure by now you have the answer to your question. But may I add a few examples of experiences as a lad. As children my cousin and I raise rabbits, there was an unspoken rivalry present in the situation. My cousin had a 6 x 8 coop where he would group all his males and leave them up to 6 months or longer, needless to say male rabbits have the same tendency as red squirrels, they neuter the competition, it was a little funny when he went to sell breeding bucks and found that all 25 males had nicely been neutered, even leaving males and females to long in the same pen can result in neutered males. Go one farther, had bought 3 beautiful flemish does and a checker giant doe and buck. $60.00 each. Instead of putting them in cages, since my trailer was located on a 1/4 acre lot with brush, trees and lots of mixed vegetation I figured I'd try the herd method on a grand scale. So turned them loose, put out food and water sources. And thought all was well. By morning the does had mortally neutered the buck and fought with the checkered doe to such a degree that the injuries where consuming. Later learned that i had a nice band of coyotes in the area which was the demise of that expensive experiment. Now I seperate all kits at 3 months, bucks to sell or thefreezer and does to sell or the auction. Selection of needed breeding stock as cages become available. Never leave bucks together for longer than 4 months and then only for a larger eating animal. And breeding is under a watchful eye until he has fallen 3 times, sometimes removing her between operations never taking the buck to the doe but rather vice versa. I do at times let the bucks run the rabbitry during the day just for exercise but because of the coyote, and fox (spotted 14 coyote one night's call) problem it requires strong cages and double floors.