Can i raise on a half acre?

halfacrehomesteader

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I have been looking into getting 2 ewes but we only live on half an acre. I have been told by many that 2 on half an acre is fine but I might have to supplement with hay year round. We are wanting to use them for their milk and to sell the lambs or use at meat. I was told to start with hair sheep because they are easier in that you dont have to sheer them. We live in a rural area but it is definitely still a neighborhood. The houses are all around 1 to 2 acres apart so not super close but not real far either. There is a house behind us on probably 4 acres that have a horse and 3 cows so there is definitely a rural feel to the area. I was curious if anyone else out there has sheep in a more neighborhood type setting and what the pros and cons are. Thanks!
 

Mini Horses

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Agree, lot too small 🥴 1/2 acre, less house area....
Very little left. Not that you can't keep them, mostly penned, absolutely on hay 24/7/365. 🤷 That would be only way.
 

Ridgetop

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You will have to dry lot them. Feed hay year-round. Where are you located? You should check your zoning even though the house behind you has horses and cows. If you are in a neighborhood of 1/2 to 1 acre properties you might have different zoning.

How much milk do you need for the family? You might be better off with a dairy goat. Goat meat is delicious. Rabbits make a lot of meat too.
 

Baymule

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We have chickens. I was mainly trying to ensure we have means to having milk and ruminant meat without relying on another system to work properly.
If the system breaks down, it also means there will be no feed for the livestock.

A trio of rabbits would be easier to raise food for than larger animals. A big garden with root vegetables like carrots, beets, etc. then figure out a way to store them. Also pumpkins, winter squash, you could raise enough to feed them.

Plant a white ball clover, cut, dry and hand bale it for winter hay.

I have 25 acres and sheep. I buy hay and feed. If SHTF I would be hard pressed to keep them fed and in good condition. Hard decisions would have to be made to slaughter down to a smaller core group that the land could sustain. I would at least have meat to feed the LGDs.
 

halfacrehomesteader

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We have chickens. I was mainly trying to ensure we have means to having milk and ruminant meat without relying on another system to work properly.
We had thought about goats but had heard from so many that they are a pain. I kept hearing they get into everything and will hop fencing 😂. We don't need a whole lot of milk. We don't go through it too fast. It would be nice to make cheese with. As far as zoning goes we live in an unincorporated area so there isn't even anyone to ask what kind of regulations there are 🤷‍♀️.
 

halfacrehomesteader

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If the system breaks down, it also means there will be no feed for the livestock.

A trio of rabbits would be easier to raise food for than larger animals. A big garden with root vegetables like carrots, beets, etc. then figure out a way to store them. Also pumpkins, winter squash, you could raise enough to feed them.

Plant a white ball clover, cut, dry and hand bale it for winter hay.

I have 25 acres and sheep. I buy hay and feed. If SHTF I would be hard pressed to keep them fed and in good condition. Hard decisions would have to be made to slaughter down to a smaller core group that the land could sustain. I would at least have meat to feed the LGDs.
Thanks for the reply! We are starting a garden this summer and I'm going to try out canning 😊. I have heard a lot of people recommend rabbits I don't think I would care too much for it. We have considered meat birds though which we eat a lot of chicken. I guess though I would eat anything if I was hungry enough.
 

SageHill

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As far as zoning goes we live in an unincorporated area so there isn't even anyone to ask what kind of regulations there are 🤷‍♀️.
Unincorporated is the way to go - just means you'll have to check county zoning. Yeah there's that. County is usually quite less restrictive than city/town zoning. But it IS there. And - all it takes is one unhappy neighbor -- could be someone who hasn't moved in yet (yeah never know when someone's going to sell their place). And complaints (at least here) can be anonymous. I've always lived in unincorporated areas for just that reason.
 

Ridgetop

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I have heard a lot of people recommend rabbits I don't think I would care too much for it. We have considered meat birds though which we eat a lot of chicken.
Rabbit meat is just like chicken, all white meat. Highly recommended for people with high cholesterol or stomach problems. If you raise the rabbits in hanging wire cages, they do not get mites or other parasites. Below the cages you make worm beds. The manure which falls into the worm beds is great for the garden and fresh rabbit manure is safe to put straight on plants unlike chicken or other manure which has to be aged to prevent it burning plants. Skinning rabbits is much easier and faster than plucking chickens. A trio of rabbits (1 male - 2 females) will produce about 80 lbs. of live weight meat (40 lbs. dressed meat) every 3 months.
 
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