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Carla D-Great new adventures and an Amazing Life

Discussion in 'Member's "BackYardHerds" Journals' started by Carla D, Nov 1, 2018.

  1. Nov 8, 2018
    B&B Happy goats

    B&B Happy goats True BYH Addict

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    Great to see you moving forwards carla:clap:frow:love
     
    Carla D, Rammy and Senile_Texas_Aggie like this.
  2. Nov 8, 2018
    Carla D

    Carla D Loving the herd life

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    I think I’m considering selling possibly as many as four of them. After having the two big ones for two days I have a better idea about feeding them is going to be costly. In just the two day period of having the bigger goats there was more feed and hay eaten in those two days by all ten of them then these eight have in total over the six weeks I’ve had them. I do have a really tough time placing any animal in a new home. I have no control over how well they are being treated, fed, and cared for. I worry about the small amount of animals I have actually parted with in the past. I don’t have a problem get them into hands that are better off than we are financially, more experienced than I/we are. I don’t think about an animal being passed off to different owners during their lifetime. From my understanding wethers are considered worthless to many people, and they believe the only thing they are good for is burning up their money because eating is the the thing they are really good at. So I’m concerned that would happen to any of my goats that I may get rid of. And on the other hand I don’t think anyone wants an intact buck if they aren’t registered or of breeding standards. I don’t feel that way about bucks or wethers. I think I might prefer males or wethers over females or breeding bucks. That is just me though. I’ve always gotten along better with people of the opposite sex. And all of my truly special or favorite animals have been fixed males. So now that I’m remotely considering to part with a few of them I’m left in a new dilemma. Which would be easier to find good homes for? And which stands a better chance of having a great life. Buck or wether? I don’t put time into my animals to make a profit off of, to breed them, or to be eaten. I’m pretty sure that the outcome for any I may part with will one of those three things. I’ve never had an animal that I didn’t try very hard to give them a good life, lots of love, and taken care of the way I possibly could. These goats are going to be outdoors with a pasture of really nice alfalfa/clover/tall grass all mixed together. They won’t have acres to be on so I don’t consider that being pasture grown. They will have only about 1200-1300 sqft to eat, graze, browse, play, and do the goat thing. That is probably a space more appropriate for 3-4 goats than it is for 8 goats. At this moment and with what I’ve learned this week I’m not comfortable getting anymore goats. If I ever do gat more goats I’m thinking with the amount of space we can dedicate to goats, the amount of money, feed, hay, and vetting would also be better suited for 4-6 small or mini goats. There is a chance we could get our hands on two more acres to do our farming thing on. Then we’d have more space, hay, and grazing for them. But being really new at the farm thing, I don’t even know if they too much to where the field would continue to grow all year and sustain their bellies and bodies. Or even if long time poorly managed field has goat quality greens to provide the majority of their nutrition or if we will have provide mostly pellets and grains for them. I can’t tell the difference between different types of hay. I can tell that they are different simply by looking at them but anything more than that is a guessing game for me. I did buy bales of hay that they really, really love but honestly I don’t know what type of grass hay it is. To me and to my husband think it’s pretty much overgrown lawn grass. But from what I’ve been reading that’s one of the last things a goat will eat and only if they are hungry. I know everyone starts their learning process at different times and stages of their lives. I just found out my goats definitely have a triple parasite problem. Is it something I could have prevented, did I not do something I should have? They are growing like weeds. I think they have possibly gained 20-25 pounds since I brought them to our farm. That either tells me I’m doing a really good job taking care of them, or I’m overfeeding them. I’m not sure which. I’m all of a sudden feeling too uneducated and non experienced to be having any goats much less eight of them. I have thought about getting goats for two or three years now. But thinking is not knowing or having experience. I don’t have any interest in breeding goats not in the least bit. I don’t wish to be a dairy farmer and having to milk goats a couple time a day. It’s always been more of wanting to love them them and giving them a good life. With the added benefit of weed/brush control. Basically a glorified pet. The only reason I bought 9 babies is it cost less to buy all 9 than it would to buy three or five of them. They do it 1-4 bucklings $20 each, five or all but one of them for $10 each, or all of them for $5. At the moment it made more sense to buy all 9 of them. But in all honesty we really planned on having 3-4 goats. Yet another thing I should have thought about at least a little bit longer. Their size as adults doesn’t bother in the least. But I’m now wondering if we really have enough space and greens to properly feed and care for them.

    So now I’m in another thought provoking and stressful position. I just got one issue resolved and I worked out for the best. Now do I leave them all bucks, wether all of them, or wether all but the one that I would want to use for breeding if I ever decided to breed a goat or a few goats. I think being disabled to the point where I can’t escape some of these thoughts or stresses momentarily by going to work is a whole lot more difficult than the 100 hours per week was. Odd! I guess it time to either throw caution into the wind and take things as they come. Or significantly slow myself down. I’ve never been any good at moderation. It’s either more than I can and should or not at all.
     
  3. Nov 8, 2018
    Carla D

    Carla D Loving the herd life

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    Why can’t I write simple short replies or posts? I’m starting to think that may be my method of working through issues or questions. Why can’t I just write this stuff in a journal?
     
    Senile_Texas_Aggie and Rammy like this.
  4. Nov 8, 2018
    Southern by choice

    Southern by choice Herd Master Golden Herd Member

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    Maybe my comment in the other post better brings better understanding. We rather put a wether/buck in the freezer than go through the "what is going to happen".
    Standard bucks are rarely pets. That is just a fact.
    Standard bucks in tact are used for breeding, most are selective of a buck they choose.
    People need to eat, food is good.
    A friend of mine doesn't feel she is skilled enough to determine whether a buck born is "good enough" to be intact and bred. All her bucks are castrated at 8 weeks, they are given great care, fed well and at 80 lbs they are processed. That valuable meat feeds her family for months.
    Although we all look at our goats as pets, they are still livestock.

    I think it is wise for you to reduce. As the area you have will not be sufficient at 1,200 -1,300 SF that works out to about 35 x 35. This will not be enough for 2 male goats of 250# size to utilize the area for food, so although they can live in it all their nutrition will come from hay, grain... mostly hay because too much grain can cause Urinary Calculi ( I gave you a link in another thread).
    You will need to monitor for parasites.

    So far I think you are learning and doing well, many things you didn't know but you do now. You have time to make decisions, to rehome some etc. Keeping 2 and learning from them I think is a great idea. You have put a lot of love and time and energy into them.



    I also think "outloud" and it is a working through process. Nothing wrong with that other than you may get too many responses and think... oh goodness, I wish I hadn't said anything.;)
     
  5. Nov 8, 2018
    Carla D

    Carla D Loving the herd life

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    That really funny you mentioned a “goat sit down session”. Before I got these little guys I’d frequently visit and discuss things with Halfy. Halfy is a special sow. I visited her daily and shared with her my thoughts, frustrations, emotions quite frequently. She was very therapeutic for me. If she wasn’t 400# of dirt pushing, excitedly running around ball of pig I’d have brought her home with me. Even let her sleep in hubbys spot on the bed. She got injured the day we let the girls out of their farrowing crates. We don’t know exactly what happened. The vet couldn’t determine the injury, but felt if we moved her to a smaller area of her own, that was less muddy it might help her heal faster. So we did it. Anyways Halfy got the royal treatment while she was recovering. We’d go into her area talk with her, tell her what a great piggie she was, told her she’s beautiful, brought her wildflower bouquets to munch on, scratch her and pet her. She ate it all up. She got to the point where all I had to say was “Hey Beautiful.” And she’d come running to greet me. Yes, one on one sessions with a special animal does work wonders for a persons roughed up soul and spirit.
     
  6. Nov 8, 2018
    Carla D

    Carla D Loving the herd life

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    Actually it wasn’t your comment that gave me the impression many people think wethers are only good for burning your money away. A couple of people have said it in here, I’ve seen comments saying very similar things on some of the online articles I’ve read as well. I’d be really happy if people didn’t think that way. But I guess they are right to a degree. They can’t produce babies, they can’t be used for breeding. Thought of them basically only being good at eating your feed and not being able to give back anything that’s considered valuable. I do have to disagree with you on one thing however. I know my goats aren’t any different or more special than anyone else’s. But to me they are overgrown dogs that you love to death, but you have to feed them as you would livestock. But, yes going down to 3-4 goats is probably the best for me and our little farm. My husband tells me anymore than three is considered livestock, less than that can be pets. Honestly if I did have fewer goats under my care I would have all that much more to give to a select few. That in itself makes a lot of sense to me. Now I just have to figure out what I’m going to do with them. Bucks vs wethers. Pets vs meat for us or sell to someone else for meat. Maybe I can get lucky and find a couple of people that will need a companion animal or two. Too many things to think about tonight.
     
  7. Nov 8, 2018
    Carla D

    Carla D Loving the herd life

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    I have done a little bit of that. But, I’m not very good at giving myself feedback like other people are. But, yes I do see your point. They certainly are fun. I do find my husband paying quite a bit of attention to these little guys. Even my FIL gets a kick out of them. They love cheese balls, and Papa Harvey knows it and where I keep a stash of them for the goats.
     
  8. Nov 8, 2018
    greybeard

    greybeard Herd Master Golden Herd Member

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    In it's most basic element, this is simply what the centuries old domestication of livestock is all about at all levels and in most countries and cultures, it encompasses all species of fowl and livestock.
     
    Senile_Texas_Aggie likes this.
  9. Nov 8, 2018
    Southern by choice

    Southern by choice Herd Master Golden Herd Member

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    I don't think we disagree on that. Ours are too.
     
  10. Nov 8, 2018
    Baymule

    Baymule Herd Master Golden Herd Member

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    I raise sheep. Lambs are so adorable and cute, I love to hug them. I castrate the boys and name them Dinner. I love them, I care for them, I feed them, scratch and pet them. They have a good life. They have one bad day and even that is over quick. I sell the meat and we eat it. I give some away. I know what they have been fed, I know how they were cared for and I know they were loved.

    @Devonviolet and her sweet husband started with 4 pet wethers. When they were ready for their dairy does, they realized their pets would have to go. it was an agonizing decision for them. They could not bear to take them to slaughter. They sold them and the buyers said they were going to slaughter the goats. Time passed.....they had the cutest little boy baby goat you ever saw. They were going to keep him forever. Their herd increased and so did the feed bill. Reality has some hard knocks and they painfully realized that they just couldn't keep them all. They talked about it, hard decisions had to be made.

    Their freezer has goat meat in it, Goat meat from goats they raised and loved. They treat their goats exceptionally well, they love their goats. There is that reality thing again, they reasoned why should they feed, water, care for and love goats to sell them at a loss for someone else to eat? DV and her husband are proud of the meat they put on the table. When they take one to slaughter, the young man there always comments on how clean the goat is, how well cared for it is and compliments them on how healthy it is.

    DV I hope you don't mind my sharing your journey with your goats. I know how hard it was and still is for you. Indeed, I feel bad sometimes when I take lambs to slaughter. But I can't keep them all.

    Carla D I tell you this because you can only keep so many pets. There is nothing wrong with keeping pet goats. I think you are on the right track in cutting back on how many you have. Keep 3, love them, spoil them and enjoy them. I honestly do not think that you would be able to put any in the freezer. You just aren't there. You may never be there and there is nothing wrong with that.

    People here have given their advice and help and you have a lot to process and think about. Whatever you decide to do will be what is right for you and your husband. You have our support and friendship.