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chicken coccidiosis treatments

Discussion in 'Natural and Organic Husbandry' started by Jered Norris, Dec 1, 2013.

  1. Dec 1, 2013
    Jered Norris

    Jered Norris Chillin' with the herd

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    Does anyone know a natural way to prevent and treat coccidiosis in chickens?:idunno
     
  2. Dec 2, 2013
    Andrei

    Andrei Chillin' with the herd

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    I would try first propolis and then wormwood or yarrow but coccidiosis is so fast that by the time you detect it is too late.
    It is more of a preventive then cure method.
     
  3. Dec 2, 2013
    bubba1358

    bubba1358 Ridin' The Range

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    I had some success using high amounts of diatomaceous earth (DE) in feed and a lot of apple cider vinegar (ACV) in the water. I would pick up te droopy birds and quarantine then in a very small, dry, warm plastic tub with a wire top. It was probably 10% DE to feed and maybe 2tbs ACV per cup water. That cleared them up in a day or two. I brought back 4 out of 5 sick birds this way last spring.
     
    Sumi and Four Winds Ranch like this.
  4. Dec 2, 2013
    Jered Norris

    Jered Norris Chillin' with the herd

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    They get acv in their water and get De in their feed every couple of days. Would that be enough?
     
  5. Dec 2, 2013
    Andrei

    Andrei Chillin' with the herd

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    Depending of how far is the liver damage and age and how strong is their immune system.
    If some are for the freezer I would move them in.
     
  6. Dec 12, 2013
    Sweetened

    Sweetened True BYH Addict

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    I wanted to comment on this thread, even though it's a few days old at this point. I have learned a couple things about treating Cocci and have done so effectively for the past couple years doing the same methods.

    Cocci, really, isn't so much an illness, rather than a floral overgrowth within the gut, leading to a depressed immune system and thus weakness, illness and death. I use unmedicated starter and have found I end up with an issue once they're out in general population, likely due to being exposed to a lot all at once, I tend not to get the issue with brooded chicks.

    This year, I will be supplementing water with whey for 1-2 weeks prior to them being introed out into the coop, and for a week or so thereafter. Whey from raw sources is full of good, healthy flora that encourages an optimal gut environment. This should help stave off any overgrowth and might eliminate my 'remedy' method.

    For those already stricken with Cocci, I use a combination of yogurt, oil of oregano, aloe vera juice (AVJ), and apple cider vinegar (ACV).

    Into a full, large container of plain yogurt (I use astro balkan style), I put in two full drops of oil of oregano. Mix this into their feed in a ratio of 1:1 for 3 days, and down from there. At the same time, I do 1 tbsp AVJ per gallon of water for one week, then switch to ACV at the same ratio. for another 2 weeks thereafter. I have weaned them off the yogurt by the 3rd week.

    AVJ is used to promote bowl flushing without harming GOOD flora levels.

    Hope this helps.
     
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  7. Dec 14, 2013
    Beekissed

    Beekissed True BYH Addict

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    Good advice!

    Other good methods of prevention includes focus on internal and external environments:

    Low exposure to the existing coccidia loads in your current soils/pens/coops by placing some of the existing coop bedding or run soils in the chick's brooder. They can then form their own immunities and resistance to the coccidia during the first two weeks of life.

    Feeding probiotics and prebiotics~ACV with the mother, fermented foods such as those mentioned above, or just fermenting their actual feed. Make a point of providing a good internal culture to your flocks at all times.

    Coop/soil management~overstocking the soils in pens and range can lead to an overgrowth of coccidia in the soils. Proper management of that range and those pen soils is the key and keeping a healthy balance of beneficial micoorganisms as the predominant culture there is imperative. Keeping a properly managed deep litter in your coop and runs can help with this by providing good habitat for beneficial microorganisms whose healthy reproduction can inhibit the overgrowth of more harmful elements, proper ventilation in both places is important as well, and also good drainage in the runs.

    Overstocking your soils can lead to an imbalance of the microbes there and contribute to the overgrowth of harmful pathogens, so a correct stocking rate is needed. Keeping soils covered and loose so that they have good moisture and nutrient exchange will encourage a healthier soil culture and help keep coccidia levels to a manageable place. Keep stocking rates low and keep them moving across the soils so that no one area receives an overload of fecal matter.

    Judicious culling of your flocks to insure animals with good immune systems are living and reproducing, while weaker animals are not is one of the most important tools you can use. It's been calculated that 90% of parasite loads are being carried by only 5% of most flocks or herds. Targeting those animals that are prone to carry disease and parasite overloads can improve overall flock health and keep those problems from cycling through your soils and your flocks/herds.
     
  8. Apr 15, 2014
    Permajen

    Permajen Just born

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    I absolutely agree with Beekissed about adding dirt from the hen's pen when chicks are put into a brooder, and also about fermented feed. Don't think sterile if setting up a brooder, think 'gotta get that exposure happening right away'. Baby chicks can't eat a whole heap so how much cocci can they eat? Not as much as if you expose them at a week old, that's for sure.

    Fermented feed really works at preventing cocci. Soured milks are great too.

    I've found it also helps not to heat the entire brooder (if raising artificially) but only the sleep area. Cocci love warm + moist.

    Slow and gradual exposure is the trick. Never overstock your ground. Move chicks to a bigger area as soon as you can so the hatchling brooder doesn't get heavily infected (cocci are resistant to disinfectants).

    I never use medications and never see cocci. Management rules!
    regards
     
    Sweetened likes this.
  9. Aug 31, 2014
    Tea Chick

    Tea Chick Ridin' The Range

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    I don't know of any natural treatments (once the chicks already have coccidiosis), but Corid works very well. I've had an outbreak this year and lost half my new chicks this year to cocci.
    I'm sorry you're having trouble with it too!!!
    Prevention seems to be the best cure. :)