1. BYH Official Poll: What are the things that you should consider before buying herds?
    CLICK HERE!
    (if you are logged in, this notice can be dismissed using the "x" to the top right of the notice)

    Dismiss Notice
  2. Bee Hives. Swarm information, history, lessons and more
    CLICK HERE!
    (if you are logged in, this notice can be dismissed using the "x" to the top right of the notice)

    Dismiss Notice
  3. Dismiss Notice
  4. BYH Picture of the Week (POW) - Submit your Pics Now !!
    Click HERE!
    (if you are logged in, this notice can be dismissed using the "x" to the top right of the notice)
    Dismiss Notice

Children and new goats

Discussion in 'Behaviors & Handling Techniques - Goats' started by Talithahorse, Dec 26, 2016.

  1. Dec 26, 2016
    Talithahorse

    Talithahorse Chillin' with the herd

    Joined:
    Jan 18, 2015
    Messages:
    18
    Likes Received:
    6
    Trophy Points:
    29
    Okay, so I am brand new to goats as we have just brought home 3 little pigmy goats. Two doelings and a buckling (soon to be whether) all about 4 1/2 mo old. They are for my children who are 11 and 15 years old. My son (10) has chosen the buckling as his own, my daughter one of the doelings. What ideas, suggestions, "no no's" etc. for helping them with training, feeding etc.

    So far as far as feeding, they are getting good quality burmuda grass hay at all times, then about 1 cup of goat feed (Purina brand I think), free choice loose minerals and then the kids are providing them with privet cuttings and other approved treats. The goats get their goat food only when we are there (encourage interaction). The kids have been instructed to sit down on a bucket and spend time with them (supervised of course). They have also been told to keep their faces away from the horns and to not pet them near the horns. We have put collars on them and have just begun putting a lead rope and teaching them to give to the pressure, which they are just starting to figure out. (for all you horse people out there I am using my Perelli training).

    I have trained horses, dogs, birds,etc so I am not new to animals in general but I am sure that goats are somewhat different and that is what I am trying to learn.

    Also I am not sure how to tell when they are bloated and at what point should I be concerned. Should I just put some baking soda out when I think they might need it or should I "dose" them? They have had a few different transitions before they arrived at our house and have not been extensively handled so I was wondering of some of the bloating (that may or may not be bloating at all) may be due to the changes. I say this because the buckling, who seems to be the most timid gets really nervous when we catch him that he seems to bloat up a little bit and then start burping and is fine a couple of hours later when we come back.

    Right now they are housed in a 12X 14 stall with a tiny 5X5 yard fenced with chainlink and topped with netting (originally designed for chickens). Once they are able to be led, they will have access to a yard with horse fencing and then a portable panel pen to rotate them to different browse during the day. I just don't want to risk them escaping until the kids get them bucket trained and able to be led. (already spent over a year chasing a wayward steer because he was not bucket trained)

    The vet comes this week to take care of the buckling and check them out.

    Sorry for so many questions and being longwinded.
     
  2. Dec 27, 2016
    Latestarter

    Latestarter Novice; "Practicing" Animal Husbandry Moderator

    Joined:
    Dec 31, 2014
    Messages:
    6,372
    Likes Received:
    6,226
    Trophy Points:
    433
    Location:
    NE Texas
    Right now I'd say your biggest concern should be to get a fecal done to check for parasite load and cocci. Typically, any time you move/stress out a goat, there is the chance of a parasite bloom. Cocci is not a worm and must be looked for in addition to, as the treatment is different. Cocci is a kid killer and it happens fast. Any time you change/add foods, you should do so slowly over a period of time to not cause digestive issues. You could offer some baking soda and see if they want/need it.

    Just a word of caution... @ 4.5 months, those goats are quite capable of breeding. Were I you, I would get that buck castrated ASAP and keep him separated for at least 6 weeks after he's been neutered. Takes a while to get all those little buggers out of his system. He can be kept within sight of the does for companionship/conversation, but not capable of physical connection. Goats have been known to breed "through a fence"...

    Meantime, there's a lot of great info in the various threads. Browse around a bit and make yourself at home.
     
  3. Dec 27, 2016
    Talithahorse

    Talithahorse Chillin' with the herd

    Joined:
    Jan 18, 2015
    Messages:
    18
    Likes Received:
    6
    Trophy Points:
    29
    Thanks for the information. The vet comes out Thursday. (Couldn't get him any sooner due to the holidays) I didn't realize he would need to be separate for 6 weeks afterward. I thought it was just a few days. will get him set up.
     
  4. Dec 31, 2016
    Talithahorse

    Talithahorse Chillin' with the herd

    Joined:
    Jan 18, 2015
    Messages:
    18
    Likes Received:
    6
    Trophy Points:
    29
    Good news. The billy is now a whether, the girls are not pregnant and the children have almost got them trained to walk on a lead. Now it's time to work on a portable pen so they can get to work...
     
    Latestarter likes this.