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Coccidia in lambs

Discussion in 'Diseases & Injuries - Sheep' started by Robyn8, May 10, 2019.

  1. May 10, 2019
    Robyn8

    Robyn8 Loving the herd life

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    I posted this in another string, but wasn't sure if anyone would see it.

    I have 3 adult sheep, 2 adult goats, and 4 4H lambs. They are all housed together on pasture with the 4H lambs separated at night and for feeding. 1 of the 4H lambs has loose stool. Fecal showed coccidia at +++ (great than 51 egg count). Everyone else's stool seems fine. Everyone is eating, drinking, and acting normally. The lambs get a medicated feed, but I am not sure if the one with coccidia was on medicated feed prior to coming to us 2 weeks ago. Should I just treat the one with loose stool, or everyone, or just the lambs?

    What should I treat with? I have toltrazuil on hand because I used it last summer when our current adult sheep were babies and had coccidia. I was scared to use Corid because we had already had a goat with Polio that summer and I read Corid can cause Polio. But since these are market lambs, I know Corid is probably a better choice for meat withdrawl. I read toltrazuil has a 40 day withdrawl and the fair is well over 100 days away, so it should still be ok, right?

    Any suggestions would be appreciated!
     
  2. May 10, 2019
    Rammy

    Rammy Herd Master Golden Herd Member

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  3. May 10, 2019
    Baymule

    Baymule Herd Master

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    I haven't had this problem, so will be watching with interest.
     
  4. May 10, 2019
    Mike CHS

    Mike CHS Herd Master Golden Herd Member

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    We use Corid at the first sign. We do our own fecals but when we see the signs we don't bother and assume they need Corid. We haven't had many losses but the couple we did have were because we didn't treat.
     
  5. May 10, 2019
    babsbag

    babsbag Herd Master

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    Toltrazuril seems to work sometimes and not others but it works better for prevention than for treatment. If you don't want to use Corid get some DiMethox 40% injectable and give it orally. It is a long dose...10 days to stop the life cycle but only 5 days for prevention. I would treat the one and do preventative dose on the others. 1 cc /5 lbs. first day 1 cc /10 lbs. next 4 days. (9 days for the one)
     
  6. May 11, 2019
    Sheepshape

    Sheepshape True BYH Addict

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    Over here (and trade names are often different, so I'll use the generics) we use tolrazuril and diclazuril. All young animals need to be treated, though the adults probably don't as they were exposed last year and have some resistance.

    Having had this awful disease kill animals some years back, my advice to you is TREAT. Once an animal gets coccidiosis, the gut may never recover fully.

    Coccidiosis is faecal-oral transmission and singularly the best way of preventing spread is to move feeding dishes, troughs/feeders daily and change pasture regularly, so animals are not grazing contaminated material.

    Good Luck.
     
    mysunwolf likes this.
  7. May 11, 2019
    Robyn8

    Robyn8 Loving the herd life

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    Thank you for all the advice! I will treat all the lambs and report back on how they are doings. The one with loose stool isn’t that bad yet. Actually I think it had firmed up a bit even without treating so I think I am catching it early on. And maybe part of the issue is diet change as I wasn’t able to get them on the same grain the farmer had them on.