contagious ecthyma

nstone630

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I'm glad I could be of help. Let us know how things turn out for her!
Vet came out today. Said classic presentation for sore mouth. Says since there is no secondary bacterial infection is why it doesn't look near as bad as all pictures I see on line. So I need to keep it clean, carefully as not to get it myself. And it will run its course in 3-4 wks.
 

Alaskan

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Vet came out today. Said classic presentation for sore mouth. Says since there is no secondary bacterial infection is why it doesn't look near as bad as all pictures I see on line. So I need to keep it clean, carefully as not to get it myself. And it will run its course in 3-4 wks.
Well...nice to know for sure.

Keep us updated.

Poor girl.
 

misfitmorgan

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Vet came out today. Said classic presentation for sore mouth. Says since there is no secondary bacterial infection is why it doesn't look near as bad as all pictures I see on line. So I need to keep it clean, carefully as not to get it myself. And it will run its course in 3-4 wks.
Good to know. It not looking bad is the same reason I was thinking it was not sore mouth, least it isnt so bad looking and quicker recovery probly.
 

nstone630

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It seems to be getting better pretty quick.
So hard to get a good picture she moves around so much haha.
She is doing so good, eating and hydrating.
Those ears haha
I am going to keep her separated for at least another week just to be safe and watch her closely.
 

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Alaskan

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It seems to be getting better pretty quick.
So hard to get a good picture she moves around so much haha.
She is doing so good, eating and hydrating.
Those ears haha
I am going to keep her separated for at least another week just to be safe and watch her closely.
I most excellent update!!! :weee
 

Baymule

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I may be out of line here, please correct me, if so. If your herd is healthy and doesn’t have sore mouth, then why on earth would you keep this animal? Her symptoms may go away, but she still has the virus. Granted, I have not had to deal with this-and never want to. I guess I’m asking those who have responded (and have vastly more knowledge than I do) will she pass the virus to her offspring? I’ve seen pictures of new lambs and kids with sore mouth. If it didn’t pass through the placenta, then where did it come from?

Again I may be out of line here, please accept my apologies if I offend or hurt your feelings. This goat will always have the virus. If I’m correct, she will pass it to her offspring, then you go through the whole separation and isolation again, while trying not to contract it yourself. Possible contamination of your property and spread to your other goats. Am I being a little too dramatic or can this really happen? I’m so sorry, no matter how cute, beautiful or adorable she is, she wouldn’t stay on my place.
I wish you the best with her. Have you contacted the people you got her from? Did they knowingly sell you a goat with sore mouth? I’d be mighty PO’ed. I’ll shut up now.
 

Alaskan

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I may be out of line here, please correct me, if so. If your herd is healthy and doesn’t have sore mouth, then why on earth would you keep this animal? Her symptoms may go away, but she still has the virus. Granted, I have not had to deal with this-and never want to. I guess I’m asking those who have responded (and have vastly more knowledge than I do) will she pass the virus to her offspring? I’ve seen pictures of new lambs and kids with sore mouth. If it didn’t pass through the placenta, then where did it come from?

Again I may be out of line here, please accept my apologies if I offend or hurt your feelings. This goat will always have the virus. If I’m correct, she will pass it to her offspring, then you go through the whole separation and isolation again, while trying not to contract it yourself. Possible contamination of your property and spread to your other goats. Am I being a little too dramatic or can this really happen? I’m so sorry, no matter how cute, beautiful or adorable she is, she wouldn’t stay on my place.
I wish you the best with her. Have you contacted the people you got her from? Did they knowingly sell you a goat with sore mouth? I’d be mighty PO’ed. I’ll shut up now.
I hadn't even considered that!!!! :ep
 

misfitmorgan

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To the best of my knowledge the infected goat will have immunity for at least 1 year, but after that can get sore mouth(orf) again if exposed to it. So long as the entire area she is in is disinfected very very well and all bedding is disposed of safely without leaving anything behind the rest of the herd should not get orf. Sore mouth can survive on bedding, stalls and pastures for up to 17yrs in dry climates. As far as her spreading it to your herd, it doesnt seem likely once she is totally healed up. So long as she has nothing contagious on her, hair, hooves, ears, etc she should be safe. So long as no animals are brought in with orf and exposed to the rest of the herd you should not have a problem. Orf is a virus so as long as nothing brings the virus to the herd they are "clean" and you will not have any other problems with orf.

Also NEVER vaccinate a herd that does not have orf with orf vaccines, it is a live virus and will give your entire herd orf, which is good for immunity but very very bad for your barn/pasture as it will harbor the virus for years and you will forever have a problem with orf.

As mentioned this is to the best of my understanding, if someone knows something more or different please do share.
 
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Baymule

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Thanks for the input @misfitmorgan I believe the OP needs to know this information in order to make an informed decision to keep the goat or not.

Can't the goat spread the virus to her offspring? I've seen pictures of lambs with sores on their little mouths and too sore to nurse. If then didn't get it from their moms, then where did it come from? Based on this, I just wouldn't keep that goat.

Good point on the vaccination.
 

misfitmorgan

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Thanks for the input @misfitmorgan I believe the OP needs to know this information in order to make an informed decision to keep the goat or not.

Can't the goat spread the virus to her offspring? I've seen pictures of lambs with sores on their little mouths and too sore to nurse. If then didn't get it from their moms, then where did it come from? Based on this, I just wouldn't keep that goat.

Good point on the vaccination.
As far as I know they can't get it from their mom unless the mom actively has cores. The farms that I know that deal with orf get it in their lambs due to contamination/infectious materials on bedding, pasture, stalls, feed bunks, buckets, etc. A surprising number of operations in the US keep livestock with orf because it doesnt usually kill the livestock and 43% of the livestock in the US currently has orf. The larger your herd the more likley you will come across it. So long as they do no have sores when you buy them and you quarantine properly before introducing to your flock you should be ok.

I would like to think I personally would not keep an animal with orf in my herd but I can see why larger operations do, with replacing stock and males from outside sources it is just a thing that happens I guess. When we go commercial I am expecting to come across orf.
 
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