LMK17

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You can look up ’average concentration of elements in’. Your county...it will bring up a website with the US...you click on your county and it lists your exact elements...I wrote all of mine down..so that I know..if we have good selenium here...good copper, good iron, etc...that might be helpful
That's a really good start and definitely worth checking out. Just keep in mind that soils do vary, even within a single property. It's also a good idea to know water concentrations of minerals from whatever water source you use for irrigation & your stock, and to keep in mind that some minerals can interfere with the uptake of others.
 

LMK17

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I’m new with my goats...and some people had me obsessing over everything...I’m calmer now...phew! :)
It's easy to freak out. Been there. In actuality, though, our soil hasn't been tested for something like 7 years (it is on my spring to-do), I know my my feeding and supplementing system could use some refining, and like I said, my goats probably could use an extra pedicure or two a year. Still, my animals are thriving. I'm certainly not suggesting getting sloppy, and I think one should be open to learning all the time, but at the same time, I don't think it's reasonable for one farmer-- especially a small, diversified one with an off farm career-- to know all.the.numbers.all.the.time. For me, I feel like I can make up for some lack of knowledge by getting to know *my* animals and *my* land well. I get eyes on all my critters at least one a day and try to get hands on them too. I walk my land a lot, taking in the details like whether the grass is flourishing or whether I'm seeing more/different weeds popping up. It helps me to know when something changes, and then I can go in and figure out what to do about it, rather than trying to be a walking textbook.
 

Duckfarmerpa1

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It's easy to freak out. Been there. In actuality, though, our soil hasn't been tested for something like 7 years (it is on my spring to-do), I know my my feeding and supplementing system could use some refining, and like I said, my goats probably could use an extra pedicure or two a year. Still, my animals are thriving. I'm certainly not suggesting getting sloppy, and I think one should be open to learning all the time, but at the same time, I don't think it's reasonable for one farmer-- especially a small, diversified one with an off farm career-- to know all.the.numbers.all.the.time. For me, I feel like I can make up for some lack of knowledge by getting to know *my* animals and *my* land well. I get eyes on all my critters at least one a day and try to get hands on them too. I walk my land a lot, taking in the details like whether the grass is flourishing or whether I'm seeing more/different weeds popping up. It helps me to know when something changes, and then I can go in and figure out what to do about it, rather than trying to be a walking textbook.
Very true. We just just started this farm one year ago exactly, and have everything expect cows and sheep basically..oh, horses...lol. It’s a hobby farm....but we are lucky to be retired young. We probably got too much too soon, so im learning fast and hard. But it’s a true passion..but, it’s also how I got a bit overboard...ugh! But this forum is great
 

Judy-Ron

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I give a 4g copper bolus to all my adult boers each time I hoof trim them (about 4x/yr). They also receive free choice goat minerals and occasional pelleted feed with added copper. The cooper oxide wire particles inside the capsules sit in the goats' digestive systems and are absorbed slowly over time. Based on the research I've seen, the copper boluses don't pose a significant risk of copper toxicity in goats.

Additionally, there is evidence that the copper particles act as a natural dewormer to inhibit barber pole worms.

Lots of research here: https://www.wormx.info/copper-oxide-wire-particles
My little guy (ND) is only 4 mos. old and he already is showing fish tail and his fur is rough and bleached out in less than a month from when we got him. He weighs 25 lbs so I bought the kid size (2g) bolus and gave him one about five days ago. So far his fur seems softer but I don't see any change in his coloring or in the tail. I know it is a slow release but did I give him enough and how long should I wait to give him more if he needs it?
 

Judy-Ron

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I’m new with my goats...and some people had me obsessing over everything...I’m calmer now...phew! :)
Good idea, we live in Central Florida where the soil is very poor. It's mostly sand and has no copper or selenium so we have to feed loose minerals. But the copper apparently isn't enough for them so I did get a 2g bolus for kid goats. I just didn't want to overdose him. If I need to give him more I'll know in a few weeks. I'm not sure myself how much they need here...
 

LMK17

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Since he's so young, I wonder if he had a congenital copper deficiency? He seems healthy and energetic? Head up, tail up, bright eyes, and all that? Here's an article on copper deficiency that touches on deficient kids, in case you haven't already seen it: https://www.tennesseemeatgoats.com/articles2/copperdeficiency.html

Any chance he's wormy? Or has lice or other parasites? Both those things can cause a rough looking coat and missing hair, and it's always a good idea to consider all possible diagnoses. I know you mentioned your vet. Has the vet seen the goat or run any tests?
 

Judy-Ron

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Since he's so young, I wonder if he had a congenital copper deficiency? He seems healthy and energetic? Head up, tail up, bright eyes, and all that? Here's an article on copper deficiency that touches on deficient kids, in case you haven't already seen it: https://www.tennesseemeatgoats.com/articles2/copperdeficiency.html

Any chance he's wormy? Or has lice or other parasites? Both those things can cause a rough looking coat and missing hair, and it's always a good idea to consider all possible diagnoses. I know you mentioned your vet. Has the vet seen the goat or run any tests?
 

Judy-Ron

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Yes, he's very active, tail up spunky and running around like a 4 month old should...It's just the symptoms that I've noticed that makes me think he's copper deficient. He had a vet check on Dec 30, fecal clean, good weight, ears had dirt in them but no mites or lice found by vet or me.. He did have coccidia present in fecal so I did drench him with Toltrazaquil that afternoon and will repeat in 10 days. Other than that he's just peachy!
 

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