Cydectin and Safeguard Milk Withdrawal Period

oaksandiron

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(edited for typos)

Hi, all, I am giving a fair amount of background info, but there are actual questions should you hang in there and read to the end!

I have been working closely with my vet to work out an effective deworming regimen for the animals I have on the land I have. One of my new does registered a 3900 fecal egg count, even though her FAMACHA and body condition were low but not alarmingly so. On our vet's recommendation, and with the disclaimer that her life was in jeopardy, we dosed her with both Cydectin and Safeguard. She survived, is out of the woods, and a retest resulted in a fecal egg count of zero (which is really >50).

Now, we are instructed to deworm the entire goat herd (8 altogether) the same way, with the exception of 2 of the healthiest-looking and highest FAMACHA to help counteract thdevelopment of resistance.

My only doe in milk also got tested, and even though she looked good, her numbers were high (around 1800.) I decided to deworm her because I knew her numbers were high, she is lactating, and being bred back this fall.

THE MAIN POINT of all these words is to ask: what is the withdrawal time for cydection and fenbendazole? The best I could come up with is maybe eight days, but it was not real confident, and the primary issue is that there does not seem to be a known withdrawal period for fenbendazole and "should not be used for lactating does."

Should I start keeping milk again after 8 days? Or should I just dry her off?
 

rachels.haven

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Don't deworm your whole herd or even the majority of the goats all at once unless they are anemic or in decline in poor body condition and can't be perked up otherwise. The unwormed ones serve as refugia and buffer you against creating a resistant worm population. Less is more with treating, and when you do treat, treat hard and only as much as you absolutely need to. Red cell and/or pig iron is very useful. You may need to work through your herd slowly and worm the worst, one or two at a time. Goats will always have worms. I hope your vet understands caprine parasite resistance. The best defence against resistance is having majority untreated animals (and the more animals you have untreated vs the one or two you treat results in a more stable non-resistant population).

And during withdrawl you milk through withdrawl time but do not drink it. No need to dry off.

Good luck.
 

oaksandiron

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Don't deworm your whole herd or even the majority of the goats all at once unless they are anemic or in decline in poor body condition and can't be perked up otherwise. The unwormed ones serve as refugia and buffer you against creating a resistant worm population. Less is more with treating, and when you do treat, treat hard and only as much as you absolutely need to. Red cell and/or pig iron is very useful. You may need to work through your herd slowly and worm the worst, one or two at a time. Goats will always have worms. I hope your vet understands caprine parasite resistance. The best defence against resistance is having majority untreated animals (and the more animals you have untreated vs the one or two you treat results in a more stable non-resistant population).

And during withdrawl you milk through withdrawl time but do not drink it. No need to dry off.

Good luck.
Thank you VERY much for your reply! So I will take the vet's advice a step further and spot-treat the palest FAMACHAs or lesser condition.

Do you know what the withdrawal time actually is for both of the chemicals I am using? I am definitely still milking, just pouring it down the drain. :(

Edited to add: that is the exact chart the vet's office sent me, but now I have it in printable form for my barn binder, thank you!
 

rachels.haven

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Thank you VERY much for your reply! So I will take the vet's advice a step further and spot-treat the palest FAMACHAs or lesser condition.

Do you know what the withdrawal time actually is for both of the chemicals I am using? I am definitely still milking, just pouring it down the drain. :(
Yes, it's at the bottom of the chart in the notes, if I'm not mistaken.
 

Ridgetop

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Don't dry her off. The milk can be safely fed to chickens as clabber and goat kids. Possibly pigs if you make sure they are not going to slaughter for another 30 days.

BYW I also printed off this chart to keep in my livestock medication file.
 
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