1. BYH Official Poll: What are the things that you should consider before buying herds?
    CLICK HERE!
    (if you are logged in, this notice can be dismissed using the "x" to the top right of the notice)

    Dismiss Notice
  2. Peachicks - Featured Thread
    CLICK HERE!
    (if you are logged in, this notice can be dismissed using the "x" to the top right of the notice)

    Dismiss Notice
  3. Dismiss Notice
  4. BYH Picture of the Week (POW) - Submit your Pics Now !!
    Click HERE!
    (if you are logged in, this notice can be dismissed using the "x" to the top right of the notice)
    Dismiss Notice

Dairy Breed

Discussion in 'Breeds & Breeding - Goats' started by Amaggio, Aug 6, 2019.

  1. Aug 6, 2019
    Amaggio

    Amaggio Exploring the pasture

    Joined:
    Aug 2, 2019
    Messages:
    2
    Likes Received:
    4
    Trophy Points:
    16
    I'm planning on getting goats next spring and want to start making cheeses. My 60 year old parents live with me and help me with the farm chores so i was thinking dwarf Nigerians would be good because they're smaller and have a high fat content in their milk which would help with cheese making. Nubians seem sweet too and although they have a lower fat content to their milk they also give more milk and seem to have good temperaments too. Thought i would reach out to the community here for some thoughts on breeds.
     
    Pastor Dave and B&B Happy goats like this.
  2. Aug 6, 2019
    B&B Happy goats

    B&B Happy goats Herd Master Golden Herd Member

    Joined:
    Oct 7, 2018
    Messages:
    4,522
    Likes Received:
    13,248
    Trophy Points:
    463
    Location:
    North central florida
    I have had both breeds, the nigerians take up less space. You can have more per acre of them and feed costs will be lower. ...With your parents being my age group, the nigerians will be easier to handle. , They are quieter than the nubians ,....and a four foot high fence has worked really well here...... The negative is they will start breeding at two months old, you want to wait till at least 8 months or 45 lbs in weight....they will cycle every 18 to 21 days so if you plan on breeding keep your buck away and in a safe , strong enclosure /run/ pasture...they WILL get pregnant through a fence....keep them apart. ....They have great personality 's and are my favorite choice of the two breeds.
    Welcome to BYH, from Florida....please post pictures when you get your goats... we just LOVE pictures, :frow..............:thumbsup.................:welcome
     
  3. Aug 6, 2019
    Southern by choice

    Southern by choice Herd Master

    Joined:
    Jun 11, 2012
    Messages:
    13,317
    Likes Received:
    14,505
    Trophy Points:
    613
    Location:
    North Carolina
    Start with how much milk you feel you will need and go from there. We breed Nigerians, Miniatures, and Standards.
    If you need a gallon of milk per day you will need quite a few good Nigerians. You will really need to look at what the goats actually produce as well as length of lactation. Nigerians can make considerable milk for their size but unfortunately many claim the goats make way more than they do. :( The Nigerian does have the best feed conversion and they are hardy however not all are created equal. ;)

    Your average standard doe will make that (gallon). 2 Standards may be too much.

    Miniatures are great because you really get the best of both worlds. High BF and great production for a medium size goat.
    IMO the mini's are truly one of the best for a homestead. Great feed conversion, easy on the land, great production.
     
  4. Aug 7, 2019
    Pastor Dave

    Pastor Dave Herd Master

    Joined:
    Dec 24, 2015
    Messages:
    1,696
    Likes Received:
    3,082
    Trophy Points:
    313
    Location:
    Crawfordsville, IN
    I am gearing up for a couple dairy goats too. I prefer miniature or dwarf and don't think I want the buck on hand for multiple reasons. I need to find what's available in Indiana to take my girls over for stud service. I will be converting a wooded area into a dry lot for them that joins open ground.

    My considerations are: space in the barn for separate stalls for delivery, a milking stand, heating considerations at milking time, having a pair for company and determining if both are to be bred/milked, selling vs. processing offspring, a breed of dog that will be content to stay with the goats and keep predators or unwanted critters out of the barn, a place for said dog to sleep and eat out of the goats' way, a way to haul to get bred, vet service, deworming and care.

    Anything I've overlooked?
     
    B&B Happy goats likes this.
  5. Aug 7, 2019
    B&B Happy goats

    B&B Happy goats Herd Master Golden Herd Member

    Joined:
    Oct 7, 2018
    Messages:
    4,522
    Likes Received:
    13,248
    Trophy Points:
    463
    Location:
    North central florida
    Lol, i believe you have covered most everything.....you only need one area for kiding and that can simply be a temporary area for when you need it, pallets work great with t posts to keep them secure. The Lgd will either find a space in your barn or choose to sleep outside.
    If you are not opposed to eating the bucks ( from kiding) when grown, ...you can band them at 8 to 10 weeks of age and let them grow out till about 11 months old (some people let them grow larger)
    When you find the breeder you are going to purchase your goats from, ask them about possibly using their buck for breeding, they may have several bucks ....(.we keep two next door)
    I used to milk in the barn without any heating, wasn't a big deal...udders are hand warmers, lol....:frow
     
    Pastor Dave likes this.