Dexter steer eating minerals for pregnant cow?

BYHforlife

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I have a Jersey cow and a Dexter yearling steer for company. I am giving the Jersey (her name is Clover) minerals for a pregnant cow. Of course, the steer wants to eat them too. Is this okay?
 

BYHforlife

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Hmm, I guess I'll ask on Backyard Chickens. :lol:
 

Donna R. Raybon

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,I used mineral mix for momma cows and herd included calves, bull, older steers. You can go look it up on Tennessee Farmers Coop, item number 678. Never had any problems in 30 years of keeping cows..
 

farmerjan

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What is the difference in the tags for a pregnant cow as opposed to a general herd mineral mix? I have never fed any mineral specifically only for pregnant cattle. In the spring we feed a Hi-Mag mineral to help compensate for the fast growth of the grass so the cattle do not get grass tetany. I have jerseys and other dairy crosses that get our standard mineral that all the cattle get. We do not have problems with anything like milk fever either, but I am not a commercial dairy where the cattle need to calve and come to full production as fast as possible. We do feed extra E and selenium in our mix since we are in a deficient area, but all the cows, calves, bulls etc get it. Also in our mix we have diatomaceous earth added .... maybe something else that I can't remember offhand. But it is good for all cattle in the field. I am thinking maybe the pregnant cow mineral has different ratios of calcium and phosphorous and perhaps potassium?

And no, to the question, molasses is not added to a mineral mix. The cattle would way over consume it and could actually get poisoned from over consumption. Many mineral mixes have salt so it is the only thing fed, but some do not.
 

Donna R. Raybon

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Milk fever can occur in any mammal producing milk. In livestock it is a management disease in that correct management eliminates.

When close up to freshening cow/goat eats ration too high in potassium it interferes with ability to mobilize calcium. All alfalfa hay, first cutting grass hay, and any heavily manured hay is too high in potassium to be safe!y fed. Anionic salt like ammonium chloride can be fed if forced to feed high risk ration. But, best to feed second or later cutting of grass hay the last 2 or 3 weeks gestation and first weeks of lactation.
 

farmerjan

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I have dealt with milk fever in cattle before. We mostly feed a grass hay but we feed 1st cutting to all dry cows. Our hay has been tested, and the vet said it was better for the dry cows than the 2nd cutting. I understand the need for calcium, that is why we have had to IV the cows with milk fever in the past. It does not always come from poor management. Some breeds are more apt to have problems. Their metabolism does not always respond to the the immediate needs. Since I went to feeding 1st cutting we have not had any milk fever problems. We also supplement with some alfalfa to all the sheep for the added protein and have eliminated all the "pregnancy toxemia" type symptoms we had in the past. My dairy cows get a leaf or 2 of alfalfa in the barn when they come in along with free choice grass hay. Since I mostly use them for nurse cows, plus what I want for the house, I don't push as hard for production. The farms that I test are pushing their cattle to come in fresh and hit their stride as soon as possible. There are cases of milk fever but not as much as in the "past". Of course, they are feeding silage and TMR's that are "force feeding" a balanced mineral to insure they have an adequate balance when they come fresh. Most have a close up program for those animals that are calving within 2 weeks or so.

You did not say what the mineral for the pregnant cows consisted of compared to a standard mineral for general consumption.
 

greybeard

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You did not say what the mineral for the pregnant cows consisted of compared to a standard mineral for general consumption

Label pictures or at least a product name is always helpful.
I have never fed any mineral specifically only for pregnant cattle. In the spring we feed a Hi-Mag mineral to help compensate for the fast growth of the grass so the cattle do not get grass tetany.
Same here. Never had any problems.
 
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