disbudded or polled???

Youngfarmer2019

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Hello, I recently received three does (goats, not rabbits;)) one was disbudded, one is naturally polled, one we are unsure about. I would like to avoid getting a naturally polled buck in order to avoid getting hermaphrodite babies. I have been talking to a lady about purchasing her buck, but from the pictures I can't tell whether he was disbudded or born naturally polled. Is there any tells? I am picking him up sunday and would appreciate any help, as I will avoid breeding the naturally polled doe if he turns out to be naturally polled.
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Baymule

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Not a goatie, I raise sheep. What are you going to use the goats for? Milk? Pets? Meat? If for milk, I believe there are diseases they should be tested for. A trip to the vet, blood draw, and you get results. @Mini Horses can give you information on that.

A fact you must deal with, buck kids happen. You already have a buck and you don’t need them. Band, and raise for your freezer. Harsh? Not at all, take to processor, get back excellent, clean meat that you raised. Name them all Dinner. That’s what I did with my ram lambs. I cut them at a few days old, they healed up, named them Dinner.

How much lad do you have for the goats?
 

Margali

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Also a sheep person, do hermaphrodite goats sickly or die early? If they grow to meat size, I'm not sure it's a huge worry.
 

Mini Horses

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The worry is that there is some evidence that breeding naturally polled to same gives a % of hermaphrodite offspring -- making them unacceptable for future breeding animals from the offspring, her goal for getting the buck.

They can be meat animals but can carry their own handling issues, not health so much as nuisance. As to life length? :idunno Anytime we raise livestock, we get an education that isn't always wanted. 😁

Dehorned doesn't always leave evidence. The hair grows over and often little scaring. The young skin covers smoothly. A scur is an obvious clue. Polled ones generally have a slight lump where horn tissue would be. Again, not always or very obvious.

@rachels.haven ... Whatcha got to add on this?
 

Youngfarmer2019

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Not a goatie, I raise sheep. What are you going to use the goats for? Milk? Pets? Meat? If for milk, I believe there are diseases they should be tested for. A trip to the vet, blood draw, and you get results. @Mini Horses can give you information on that.

A fact you must deal with, buck kids happen. You already have a buck and you don’t need them. Band, and raise for your freezer. Harsh? Not at all, take to processor, get back excellent, clean meat that you raised. Name them all Dinner. That’s what I did with my ram lambs. I cut them at a few days old, they healed up, named them Dinner.

How much lad do you have for the goats?
No, not harsh at all. Im gonna be a little honest here, I'm only 16 but have lived on a farm the majority of my life. We are honest about what we do, knowing that buck kids do happen, I plan on banding and processing myself. I have hunted, fished and process all the animals that need to be processed on our farm because i'm the only one with the guts to do it🤣

They have a 5 acre pasture for four goats and that should be plenty of space to raise their kids even if each of the does has triplets this coming spring.

found out that the buck i'm getting is actually the little tan one with the black shoulders and stripes in the picture attached, it made my day to find that out. also attached are pictures of my new does, and you can see why i was so happy. He will cross very well with the tricolor nigerian dwarfs and the black lamancha.
 

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Baymule

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You are awesome! My family always thought I was some kind of a throwback to 100 years ago. I’ve hunted, fished, raised animals and processed animals most of my life. I’ve gardened and raised much of my food.

My parents raised me in the city. I hated it. You are so fortunate that you are on a farm. Count your blessings!

You can cross fence that pasture into one acre sections and rotate their grazing. Even just one fence to rotate will help.

Let us know how everything is going for you!
 
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