Disbudding help (warning pic)

Bri

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We are first time solo disbudding. Our doe gave us a cute little buck, which we knew would be harder. He was born July second and disbudded at 4 days old. He started to seem to regrow horns so we attempted to reburn last night. One horn was already much larger and we need guidance. We burned and the hard horn came off revealing a bloody stump! Should we have kept burning until flat? We had copper, but the first time we got the bud out and the area was flat. These pictures are this morning and we applied scarlet oil last night
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babsbag

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I am not a pro at doing my own, but I have seen many done. I have also taken many to the vet to have them redone at his age because I didn't kill the horn bud. The base of the horns look really big, like you didn't burn hard enough, wide enough, or deep enough. In my experience those do not look like any my friends have done for me, they look like my burning jobs which always result in horns.

I would find an experienced person to look at them or take him to a vet now, while he is still young, and have them removed.
 

Latestarter

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Greetings and welcome to BYH @Bri Sorry you're having burn issues with your little guy. Yeah, I'd have to agree... at this point it's far better to have an expert/pro take over. You've already been at it twice... Hope you'll give us an update when it's all said and done. Mean time, browse around :caf and hope to "see you" in the threads.
 

Fullhousefarm

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I've seen three that have gown these bumps. All disbudded by someone else with lots of experience and the 30+ other goats done that year were normal (two were twin does). The first ones I had the original disbudder re-do, but I watched. I still own one of those goats, and at 6 months she looks great with no bumps. The other just had one bud like this and I re-did it for someone else. The whole bud came off in my disbudder.

I would also burn the red/oozy looking part I see you your photo. Nothing should be bleeding or oozy right after disbudding.

I second the idea to get someone with more experience to give you guidance. Watch and learn so you can handle it next time.
 

babsbag

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8 years ago I started out with one polled doe and now have 6. The only Alpine does I kept this year are polled ones. I would love to find a good polled Alpine buck but they seem hard to come by.
 

Latestarter

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Just curious, cause I don't have the brain power to digest genetics, but I read, or somehow came to "understand" that if you breed polled to polled or have a double polled genome, you have a dead fetus, or bad results in some other wicked way... Am I out to lunch on this? or does someone know exactly how this works? I ask because I really would like a polled herd as well... save a lot of trouble and anguish down the road.
 

misfitmorgan

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Just curious, cause I don't have the brain power to digest genetics, but I read, or somehow came to "understand" that if you breed polled to polled or have a double polled genome, you have a dead fetus, or bad results in some other wicked way... Am I out to lunch on this? or does someone know exactly how this works? I ask because I really would like a polled herd as well... save a lot of trouble and anguish down the road.
There was a study done which is now largely discredited that "proved" breeding polled to polled produces a higher rate of herm offspring. Yes very true the study did but the animals used in the study were the same buck line so it is now believed that that line had a higher rate of herm offspring then typical. Many people have been breeding polled to polled for generations and have not found a higher rate of herm in fact some have never seen one in their herd yet.

As a precaution many people breed a homozygous polled buck to hetrozygous polled does to make 100% polled kids but 50% kids would be hetrozygous and if bred to a hetrozygous or a horned goat later on they would make horned kids(25%horned and 50% horned respectively).

Our polled buck is the result of a polled buck and a horned doe so he is hetrozygous. We will be breeding him to our non-related doe who has 12 polled goats in her pedigree but is horned herself then breeding the first daughter that shows polled back to our polled buck and hope for a homozygous son....least thats the plan for now until we acquire another polled buck or fill our herd with homozygus does lol
 
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