1. BYH Official Poll: What are the things that you should consider before buying herds?
    CLICK HERE!
    (if you are logged in, this notice can be dismissed using the "x" to the top right of the notice)

    Dismiss Notice
  2. Let's start this week fun. Submit your Horse Humor - Featured Thread
    CLICK HERE!
    (if you are logged in, this notice can be dismissed using the "x" to the top right of the notice)

    Dismiss Notice
  3. Dismiss Notice
  4. BYH Picture of the Week (POW) - Submit your Pics Now !!
    Click HERE!
    (if you are logged in, this notice can be dismissed using the "x" to the top right of the notice)
    Dismiss Notice

Do I need to adjust how much I feed my rabbits?

Discussion in 'Feeding Time - Rabbits' started by Vasara, Mar 3, 2019.

  1. Mar 3, 2019
    Vasara

    Vasara Ridin' The Range

    Joined:
    Feb 9, 2019
    Messages:
    26
    Likes Received:
    31
    Trophy Points:
    56
    Now that the weather is getting nice, I plan to let my buns go in the tractor for 4-5 hours each day (unless it’s raining, or is it ok that they’re in the tractor in the rain? It has a covered corner) I currently give a large bunny salad in the morning, unlimited hay and pellets in the evening. I’m wondering if I’ll need to feedless greens and a smaller amount of pellets if they are munching on fresh grass and weeds 4-5 hours a day. I don’t want to over or under feed them
    They’ll be in the tractor alone since I don’t want them bred for another couple months. Blossom is still to young
     
    GypsyG likes this.
  2. Mar 3, 2019
    Tale of Tails Rabbitry

    Tale of Tails Rabbitry Loving the herd life

    Joined:
    Dec 18, 2017
    Messages:
    280
    Likes Received:
    226
    Trophy Points:
    133
    Location:
    Southeastern USA
    I think it depends mostly on your goals as to what is okay with a tractor set up: reduce your feed use, seems a healthier or more natural choice for the rabbits, less mowing...?

    When bunnies are on the ground, it may not matter if they have a cover to get out of the rain if the covered area is in a low spot where the water would tend run through or pool; ground is never absolutely level and water goes to the lowest places. Rabbits do not do well with wet conditions, so depending on the size of the tractor and the number of bunnies, I would give them more than a corner covered if you plan to leave them out in the rain and I would not leave them out in down pours or when it has been raining day after day.

    As to reduce feed vs. the more natural choice...if you are planning to only use the rabbits in the tractors for consumption and butcher them young, then it can work well. But if you think you might like to keep or sell any, then that natural choice that reduced your feed can become costly in medically treating illnesses and parasites that can be better avoided with rabbits that live off the ground in cages. Some illnesses are so much harder to contain when rabbits are on the ground any portion of the day.
     
    B&B Happy goats likes this.
  3. Mar 3, 2019
    Vasara

    Vasara Ridin' The Range

    Joined:
    Feb 9, 2019
    Messages:
    26
    Likes Received:
    31
    Trophy Points:
    56
    Thanks for your reply. I have two New Zealand Rex mix rabbits. They each have their own off the ground cage that I’ve kept them in 100% of the time. (I haven’t even had them a full month yet) I don’t want to use the tractor as a mower, I just want to five them some exercise and get them out of their cages sometimes. I want them healthy for breeding, and over all of course! The tractor would just be for daytime use when the weather is nice and the ground isn’t wet. Then I’ll put them back in their cages.
    My plan is to raise rabbits for consumption and possibly to sell. I plan to butcher around 10-12 weeks, depending on their size when that time comes.
    I guess my main concern *was* over feeding them buy allowing them to graze during the day and not change how much greens and pellets I give them. So if they graze a few hours a day, I could slightly reduce morning salads and evening pellets? By half maybe? I still want to make sure they have all the nutrients they need to be healthy.
    Now that you mentioned illness and parasites, that is my new concern! What kind of illness and parasites are we talking about here? Is there any way to allow them to graze and avoid this? How would I know if they had something? Treatment? Would it affect their meat for human consumption? Sorry for all the questions! I thought I’d done very thorough research before I got them
     
  4. Mar 3, 2019
    promiseacres

    promiseacres Herd Master

    Joined:
    Oct 5, 2012
    Messages:
    3,189
    Likes Received:
    4,333
    Trophy Points:
    413
    Location:
    NW Indiana
    If they are in the tractor I wouldn't give greens in addition to the grass they will consume. Your feed should have reccomendations on it as to how much. I would start there then reduce if need be.
     
    B&B Happy goats likes this.
  5. Mar 3, 2019
    promiseacres

    promiseacres Herd Master

    Joined:
    Oct 5, 2012
    Messages:
    3,189
    Likes Received:
    4,333
    Trophy Points:
    413
    Location:
    NW Indiana
    Coccidious (sp?) & intestinal parasites ike roundworms
    would be your main concern. No concerns with you eating them. But both can cause unthrifty and low weights rabbits and even death if not treated regularly. I use corrid for cocci twice a year and safeguard for rounds.
     
    B&B Happy goats likes this.
  6. Mar 3, 2019
    Vasara

    Vasara Ridin' The Range

    Joined:
    Feb 9, 2019
    Messages:
    26
    Likes Received:
    31
    Trophy Points:
    56
    Thank you!
     
    B&B Happy goats likes this.
  7. Mar 7, 2019
    Stephine

    Stephine Overrun with beasties

    Joined:
    May 11, 2017
    Messages:
    52
    Likes Received:
    36
    Trophy Points:
    88
    Corrid is to be used just as needed, not regularly like a wormer. If you are paying attention to your rabbits, cocci is easily spotted and treated. They should build immunity after infection to the strains in their environment.
     
    Vasara and B&B Happy goats like this.
  8. Mar 7, 2019
    Vasara

    Vasara Ridin' The Range

    Joined:
    Feb 9, 2019
    Messages:
    26
    Likes Received:
    31
    Trophy Points:
    56
    I’m getting to know my rabbits what are the symptoms to look for?
     
  9. Mar 7, 2019
    Stephine

    Stephine Overrun with beasties

    Joined:
    May 11, 2017
    Messages:
    52
    Likes Received:
    36
    Trophy Points:
    88
    Diarrhea, can be bloody, can come and go, generally unwell looking rabbit. Doesn’t move much or well, may be sitting hunched, may be off feed. Treatment needs to be prompt but is easy. Corrid gets mixed into the drinking water. With treatment they will look better within a day already.