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Ewe with 6 day old triplets attacked by dog.

Discussion in 'Emergencies, Injuries, Diseases, and Cures' started by JwPond, Mar 17, 2019.

  1. Mar 17, 2019
    JwPond

    JwPond Exploring the pasture

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    Hi, I haven’t posted on here before, but I have a situation I could use some advice on. On 2-25-19, my Katahdin Ewe, Matilda bore triplets. Six days later, a neighbors dog got into my field and viciously attacked her in the sheep fold. At first, I thought she was dead, but she got up after I kicked the dog out. I called the vet, and he asked if they were flesh wounds. There was blood but the gashes didn’t seem too deep, so he said to give her a shot of penicillin and to spray her wounds with blue coat. I did. The next day, I called another vet because she was limping on her front leg. The vet gave me about 5 preloaded syringes with anti-inflammatory medicine, and we gave her a shot but then didn’t give her another one till about 4 days later. Yesterday I noticed that she is finally laying down a lot more, and today I noticed that she seems to be breathing especially heavy. I haven’t seen her lambs nursing on her too much, and they are just laying down with her. I should also mention that I started bottle feeding one of the lambs shortly after the attack because it was the smallest and seemed to be getting pushed away when she would try to feed, but the other two have been doing ok up till now. I’ve spent money on meds but I’m getting tapped out, and I’m worried that she may be getting exhausted trying to heal while still trying to feed her lambs. I’m an amateur at this. I don’t know what I’m doing. I don’t know what to do. Any advice or help would be appreciated. Thank you, Jane
     
  2. Mar 17, 2019
    Hens and Roos

    Hens and Roos Herd Master

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  3. Mar 17, 2019
    Mini Horses

    Mini Horses Herd Master

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    I hope you have notified the neighbors about the dog and expenses that they should pay! Collect the money -- their dog, your property, their expense.

    If mine, I would consider bottle feeding the lambs. She may be stressed with the healing and milk production pulling her down. Not sure why you did not administer the provided shots as directed (waited 4 days?) as there was a reason for the meds to be given to help. Infections, discomfort, all come to mind and this is a time when your ewe needs treatment. Possibly she couldn't be caught?

    I'm not trying to criticize but, just saying this is critical for her to heal. She may need to be isolated in a pen to allow her to be vetted and monitored (she may already be). Unless the damage is on the udder, the lambs should stay with her -- even if bottled -- unless she becomes far worse. Often this need to mother helps them to rally. Sheep often just lay down and stop trying.

    I'm hoping things go well. Others who raise sheep may be able to give you more info, assistance. I do goats but, have had many animals over the years and offer what I would do, watch for, etc.

    Please keep us updated. We care and do wish you success.
     
    promiseacres likes this.
  4. Mar 17, 2019
    JwPond

    JwPond Exploring the pasture

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    Hi, thank you for your help and support. To answer your question about why we waited to administer the shot, I might not have explained very well. The vet gave us 5 prefilled syringes that were anti-inflammatory meds and told me to use how ever many I felt were needed, whether it be one shot or all 5 if needed. So we administered 1 shot, and the next day, she seemed to be doing much better, so we didn’t give any more, but on that fourth day, she seemed to be moving slower, and we decided that another one should be given. By this time, the ewe had decided we weren’t to be trusted, because those shots I’m sure didn’t feel too great, so yes, she would move away from us when we’d come closer.

    Then today, when I noticed how listless she seemed with her labored breathing, I became panicked, so I sought advice here, and I’m grateful for your response.

    Now, I wanted to give an update also. I decided to text another sheep farmer in the area to see if he could offer any advice. I also texted him a video of how she seemed to be breathing faster than the other sheep. He told me to give her a shot of LA 300, (5CC’s) and requested I video her walking with her triplets. So I went out and videoed her doing so. It was fairly easy to get her up when we came closer, lol. I sent him the video, and he replied to go ahead with the shot, that even though she was limping, she and her lambs were fat, the lambs were playing, and she would be fine and I was over paranoid. I started laughing with relief. Honestly, that was the best answer I could have received, and it relieved my anxiety tremendously. I feel so inexperienced with all of this and freely admit that I don’t know what I’m doing and don’t know how to handle situations like this. Having said that, I am learning, and I’m grateful for the advice of those who have been doing this and know what they’re doing.

    As for the neighbors and their dog; on the day it happened, we went and spoke with them and told them what had happened. They offered to pay vet bills, and the next day, they bought an electric fence to keep their dog on their property. Not only are they good neighbors, they are our friends. We are both surprised and shocked by their dogs behavior, and we both realize we can’t take chances with him, and he’s not allowed on our property.
     
    Sumi and promiseacres like this.
  5. Mar 18, 2019
    Mike CHS

    Mike CHS Herd Master Golden Herd Member

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    You got good advice and I'm glad your neighbors are stepping up to take responsibility.
     
    Mini Horses likes this.
  6. Mar 18, 2019
    Mini Horses

    Mini Horses Herd Master

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    Agree. Had it been a wool sheep dog would have had harder time biting. Katadhin, flesh right there. The LA shot was in case of infections. Just watch the areas of bite damage for any open oozing, swelling, etc. Otherwise, she'll probably heal fine and continue to care for the lambs.

    Good job. Update us in a week.....pictures of lambs would be lovely. :D We love pictures!