Fernie's Journal

Fernie

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Where are you in KY? I just moved to KY in December (I'm in Rineyville), but I came with my flock of sheep. I have Border Leicesters, Shetlands, and some crossbred ewes. I only have 5 Shetlands at the moment - 1 older ewe, her lambs from last year (ewe and a wether) and her lambs from this year that we born yesterday.

I'll be in the market for a registered Shetland ram this year and I've got a nice little moorit ram lamb (assuming he grows out nicely) available after weaning.

If the pattern holds she will birth around the 17th, The first sets were three weeks and one day apart, the next one was three weeks and two days, so Gertie should go at three weeks and three days. We will see.
 

Fernie

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From what we have seen she may have been. He has been very interested in each of the girls since we sheared them. I am waiting to see what happens.

We sheared them this weekend
92250966_2622869054595311_5703458192445407232_o.jpg


He is registered as white but has other colors in his coat after being sheared. His "white" son may have the same or similar markings.




92543311_2622537801295103_3855003842768797696_o.jpg



Not the best job but it was done with hand shears so not as pretty when finished.
 

purplequeenvt

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He’s got to be moorit under that white since he’s thrown so many moorit babies out of black ewes. What’s his registered name?

Remember, all Shetlands are either black or moorit. White (Awt) is a pattern along with solid (Aa), gray (Ag), katmoget (Ab), and gulmoget (At). Gray, kat, and gul are all co-dominate, although gray eventually can mask other patterns/markings. White is dominate over all other patterns and hides the sheep’s base color. The gene for spotting is recessive so both parents would have to pass on a spotting gene for the lamb to be spotted.

Unfortunately, your wildly colored ewe lamb will end up being gray (musket in Shetland terms). That is, a moorit base with a solid and gray gene. The spots are complicated. I’m not sure if she’s truly spotted or if the appearance of spots has to do with how her graying gene is expressing.

Any chance you’d match up the lambs with their moms so I can see who produced what? It might help figure out the color genetics in your ram.

Sorry if that was way too much I formation. I spent a lot of time trying to understand Shetland color genetics when I got my first 3 Shetland ewes. They were all out of registered stock, but only 1 of my ewes was actually registered at the time. I was able to figure out who was who and was able to get them registered as adults based on the previous owner’s records of their patterns, colors, and ear tag numbers.
 

Fernie

Overrun with beasties
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He’s got to be moorit under that white since he’s thrown so many moorit babies out of black ewes. What’s his registered name?

Remember, all Shetlands are either black or moorit. White (Awt) is a pattern along with solid (Aa), gray (Ag), katmoget (Ab), and gulmoget (At). Gray, kat, and gul are all co-dominate, although gray eventually can mask other patterns/markings. White is dominate over all other patterns and hides the sheep’s base color. The gene for spotting is recessive so both parents would have to pass on a spotting gene for the lamb to be spotted.

Unfortunately, your wildly colored ewe lamb will end up being gray (musket in Shetland terms). That is, a moorit base with a solid and gray gene. The spots are complicated. I’m not sure if she’s truly spotted or if the appearance of spots has to do with how her graying gene is expressing.

Any chance you’d match up the lambs with their moms so I can see who produced what? It might help figure out the color genetics in your ram.

Sorry if that was way too much I formation. I spent a lot of time trying to understand Shetland color genetics when I got my first 3 Shetland ewes. They were all out of registered stock, but only 1 of my ewes was actually registered at the time. I was able to figure out who was who and was able to get them registered as adults based on the previous owner’s records of their patterns, colors, and ear tag numbers.

Sorry I did not get back to you. I just saw your reply this morning.

I really could use some help with the colors. Ewes are registered Grey, Grey, Grey Katmoget, and a Fawn Katmoget. I am seeing more brown based babies and trying to figure out how that is happening.

LSSF Wrangler is the Sire. NASSA Registraation # S48991
Give me a bit to post the moms with the Babies.

I could use help to name colors and markings in the lambs. If you want to give me your thoughts that would be great. A few have lightened a bunch in the past few weeks.
 
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