Field fence for goats?

Deecarter

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Hi all,

We are about to fence in 2 large paddocks (about 1400 ft of fencing) for our LaManchas and were planning on doing field fencing like this with metal T posts every 12'
https://www.tractorsupply.com/tsc/p...field-fence-14-ga-47-in-x-330-ft?cm_vc=-10005

It says it is not recommended for goats, but can anyone tell me why it wouldn't work? We use cattle panels currently in a smaller area and move them frequently (which is exhausting and we are over it!). We tried electric netting, but the one doeling has separation anxiety and kept trying to get through it and got stuck in and that could have been a disaster. They aren't really jumpers, but do tend to stand on the cattle panels now. Any advice on affordable fencing would be appreciated. We have about a $1200 budget for posts and fencing.
It says the openings are 6 inches. I have Nubians and it would work for my goats, but probably not the baby goats or puppies.
 

Baymule

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When it all comes down to it, you do the best you can do, the best you can afford, but don’t go the cheapest because you will be ripping it out and redoing it at some point if you live there long enough.
 

farmerjan

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If at all possible, go with the 4x4 inch goat and sheep fence. It is about $350-400 a 330 ft roll.... but it is something that you will not need to replace anytime soon. One other thing to consider, as you mentioned, 6" vertical stay wires (the upright wires) will not contain baby goats or puppies or anything small. It will not contain most chickens when young either although it will keep heavy weight layers, like sex-links and other larger breeds, Rocks etc., in when mature.
That is also why I am going with 4x4 "holes" ... sheep and goat fence....rather than "normal " field fencing that we use for the cattle. I will be able to contain most of the chickens, it will keep the calves I will have here sometimes, from putting their heads through it... it will also help to DETER predators... even foxes and raccoons will have some trouble getting through 4x4 holes. It will also keep out most dogs unless they go under.
We build most of our own fence here on the farms we have. We run over 150 head of cow calf pairs, not counting the feeder calves we raise. 6" field fence is the standard for them. There is some on the farm is 12" vertical stays and even some that is 24" stays... both are useless. They are a cheap way to comply with fencing and if used in places that are not challenged with animals often, it is okay... but the cows and calves get their heads through the hole and then work their way and it stretches and breaks.
This 6" field fence does not keep our sheep in when they start to work on the fence too. Our ewes will put their heads through and it gets pushed and stretched out over time.
 

Deecarter

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If at all possible, go with the 4x4 inch goat and sheep fence. It is about $350-400 a 330 ft roll.... but it is something that you will not need to replace anytime soon. One other thing to consider, as you mentioned, 6" vertical stay wires (the upright wires) will not contain baby goats or puppies or anything small. It will not contain most chickens when young either although it will keep heavy weight layers, like sex-links and other larger breeds, Rocks etc., in when mature.
That is also why I am going with 4x4 "holes" ... sheep and goat fence....rather than "normal " field fencing that we use for the cattle. I will be able to contain most of the chickens, it will keep the calves I will have here sometimes, from putting their heads through it... it will also help to DETER predators... even foxes and raccoons will have some trouble getting through 4x4 holes. It will also keep out most dogs unless they go under.
We build most of our own fence here on the farms we have. We run over 150 head of cow calf pairs, not counting the feeder calves we raise. 6" field fence is the standard for them. There is some on the farm is 12" vertical stays and even some that is 24" stays... both are useless. They are a cheap way to comply with fencing and if used in places that are not challenged with animals often, it is okay... but the cows and calves get their heads through the hole and then work their way and it stretches and breaks.
This 6" field fence does not keep our sheep in when they start to work on the fence too. Our ewes will put their heads through and it gets pushed and stretched out over time.
That’s what I have and it works great.
 

Ron Bequeath

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Hi all,

We are about to fence in 2 large paddocks (about 1400 ft of fencing) for our LaManchas and were planning on doing field fencing like this with metal T posts every 12'
https://www.tractorsupply.com/tsc/p...field-fence-14-ga-47-in-x-330-ft?cm_vc=-10005

It says it is not recommended for goats, but can anyone tell me why it wouldn't work? We use cattle panels currently in a smaller area and move them frequently (which is exhausting and we are over it!). We tried electric netting, but the one doeling has separation anxiety and kept trying to get through it and got stuck in and that could have been a disaster. They aren't really jumpers, but do tend to stand on the cattle panels now. Any advice on affordable fencing would be appreciated. We have about a $1200 budget for posts and fencing.
After raising alpine dairy goats for 51 years and having over 225 during that time for two years i have been without any and although i loved them this has been my most peaceful two years. As has been said if its on the other side they will go for it. They will climb the fence figure out how to ground the electric, snag on the barbwire, jump wooden fences climb trees and get out on a brank the would break onder the weight of a canary and still get over and alot of time it just to come and see you, and then eat the roses. Ive found the only way i had the best luck keeping them contained was on a chain and i had to move them every 3 days. Good luck hate to sayit but goats are a live and learn situation.
 

Baymule

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After raising alpine dairy goats for 51 years and having over 225 during that time for two years i have been without any and although i loved them this has been my most peaceful two years. As has been said if its on the other side they will go for it. They will climb the fence figure out how to ground the electric, snag on the barbwire, jump wooden fences climb trees and get out on a brank the would break onder the weight of a canary and still get over and alot of time it just to come and see you, and then eat the roses. Ive found the only way i had the best luck keeping them contained was on a chain and i had to move them every 3 days. Good luck hate to sayit but goats are a live and learn situation.
That’s a good description! It makes me love my sheep even more! LOL
 
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