1. BYH Official Poll: What are the things that you should consider before buying herds?
    CLICK HERE!
    (if you are logged in, this notice can be dismissed using the "x" to the top right of the notice)

    Dismiss Notice
  2. Our Hearts go out to Notre Dame - Our Featured Thread on our sister site "The Easy Garden"
    CLICK HERE!
    (if you are logged in, this notice can be dismissed using the "x" to the top right of the notice)

    Dismiss Notice
  3. Dismiss Notice
  4. BYH Picture of the Week (POW) - Submit your Pics Now !!
    Click HERE!
    (if you are logged in, this notice can be dismissed using the "x" to the top right of the notice)
    Dismiss Notice

First time goat owner and milking

Discussion in 'Behaviors & Handling Techniques - Goats' started by Danceswgoats, Jan 28, 2019.

  1. Jan 31, 2019
    Southern by choice

    Southern by choice Herd Master

    Joined:
    Jun 11, 2012
    Messages:
    13,234
    Likes Received:
    14,231
    Trophy Points:
    603
    Location:
    North Carolina
    Having a separate stall for kidding is a really good idea.
    Most people do use a kidding stall.
    I am sure they will come around. Cool you two are in this together. :)
     
    Danceswgoats likes this.
  2. Feb 1, 2019
    Danceswgoats

    Danceswgoats Chillin' with the herd

    Joined:
    Jan 26, 2019
    Messages:
    20
    Likes Received:
    10
    Trophy Points:
    31
    Location:
    Frederick MD
    Here are our goats, or most of them.
     

    Attached Files:

  3. Feb 1, 2019
    Southern by choice

    Southern by choice Herd Master

    Joined:
    Jun 11, 2012
    Messages:
    13,234
    Likes Received:
    14,231
    Trophy Points:
    603
    Location:
    North Carolina
    Sweet!!!!!!!!!
     
  4. Mar 5, 2019
    MiniSilkys

    MiniSilkys Loving the herd life

    Joined:
    Feb 15, 2018
    Messages:
    453
    Likes Received:
    382
    Trophy Points:
    143
    Location:
    West Tennessee
    The that I have that kidded first this year was a kid from last year. I was there at her birth last year and she was a twin with a buckling. The buckling was super sweet. She let me pet her for a few weeks but after I sold her brother she wanted nothing to do with me. She would run as soon as I got close. When she was three months pregnant her whole attitude changed. I was able to pet her and feel her all over, even her legs. I would touch her udder everyday until she gave birth. The only time she wouldn't let me pet her was when she was eating. Her mama will let me touch her a stuff but it has to be quick until she is 3 months pregnant as well. Another doe is the same way, but her doe from last year will let me do anything to her. I can't get away from her. She will be a year in 1 1/2 weeks but she is not pregnant yet.
     
  5. Mar 21, 2019
    Georgia Girl

    Georgia Girl Exploring the pasture

    Joined:
    Feb 18, 2019
    Messages:
    33
    Likes Received:
    8
    Trophy Points:
    21
    I am new also to milking, my plans were to let the doe raise the kids, I plan to take the kids away at night and milk the doe in the am and then let the kids in with her all day, I plan to leave them with her after birth for about 2-3 weeks and not milk her at all, letting the kids get all the milk. My question, if I milk her in the am , will she still have some milk for the day for the kids and what do you think of my plan?
     
  6. Mar 22, 2019
    Mini Horses

    Mini Horses Herd Master

    Joined:
    Sep 4, 2015
    Messages:
    2,078
    Likes Received:
    4,609
    Trophy Points:
    328
    Location:
    S coastal VA
    Yes, she will hold back some and make more within a short time. Many do this "separate & milk". Know that a milking doe needs more nutrition. It takes a lot to make quantity and quality, real good hay &/or excellent pasture, plus quality feed on the stand. You will be rewarded with excellent milk.

    Also, some breeds will "milk thru", meaning they can milk longer than the 10 months you hear, doing well with no breeding/resting time. Some can skip a year of breeding & produce well, although generally less the last few months. Not all will/can. I have large Saanens and they are happy to do this. :cool: Well, several of them. If you don't keep a buck and/or keep only 2 or 3 does, it may be a way to keep milk and have fewer kids. Some do this to "stagger" the breeding/production. Each person has their own needs & plans. Just saying, often the does will be happy to assist with your plans. :idunno
     
    Georgia Girl likes this.
  7. Mar 22, 2019
    Georgia Girl

    Georgia Girl Exploring the pasture

    Joined:
    Feb 18, 2019
    Messages:
    33
    Likes Received:
    8
    Trophy Points:
    21
  8. Mar 27, 2019
    Fullhousefarm

    Fullhousefarm True BYH Addict

    Joined:
    Jul 16, 2012
    Messages:
    614
    Likes Received:
    882
    Trophy Points:
    203
    Location:
    Florida- land of the endless parasites
    This is what we do EXCEPT I milk them once a day before the 2-3 weeks. I don't worry about milking them out, or if I only get a few drops if they have 2+ babies. However, if you wait 2-3 weeks after kidding to milk you are likely to have quite the wrestling match with most does. They don't let down their milk and you will get quickly frustrated. I milk within a few hours of birth while all those hormones are in play and the does are almost always very compliant- even the ones that are more difficult later on. It will also let you feel that udder daily and catch any problems- like only nursing on one side, mastitis, etc right away. I've only given bottles to supplement a small triplet or quad with this plan. I don't supplement otherwise and the babies grow great.