Flat collar or slip lead for bringing home kids?

Miranda Kurucz

Ridin' The Range
Joined
Nov 19, 2016
Messages
58
Reaction score
62
Points
73
Location
Kitimat, British Columbia
Yikes. Why so far? I live in a rural spot too but the farthest I have gone for a goat is 2 hours. What state are you in?

Make sure they have water and hay. Not sure what else but wow that's a long trip!

We live in Northern BC and then on the coast. All the Nigerian dwarf breeders etc are either on Vancouver Island (So add a ferry in the middle of this trip) or down in Southern BC. We are going to do the drive all in one day so we may be able to have it done in about 14 hours-- but regardless... it's going to be a trip. Planning on having wood chips in crate to suck up urine.. hay available, water and several stops along the way to make sure they have everything they need and to stretch their legs. Car will be quiet etc but I'm not sure if there are more recommendations?

Do you think there might be complications with a trip of this length outside of general stress? I have an xl plastic dog kennel we were going to set up and then keep the car draft free and quiet and tag team the drive up.
 

Latestarter

Novice; "Practicing" Animal Husbandry
Golden Herd Member
Joined
Dec 31, 2014
Messages
11,384
Reaction score
17,438
Points
623
Location
NE Texas
I wouldn't recommend carrying a goat kid in your lap for 16 hours... unless you are wearing rubber pants and the car seat is moisture proofed... Many transport them in a pet carryall/cage/crate... They're going to be pretty small and 2 of them should pretty easily fit in a large dog crate. Put some hay in there with them and they should transport just fine.

That coop looks familiar to me... Didn't you post pictures while rehabbing it over on BYC? I think I recall you posting pictures with coyotes in the background and talking about bears. My memory isn't what it once was, but if so, aren't you in Canada someplace? Regardless, glad you're here! As for too many pics? BWAHHAHAhahaha.... Nevah Happen! :D =D (Although some of us get a bit crotchety when folks quote posts with a lot of pictures in them and leave all the pictures there so we get to scroll through them multiple times to get to the actual post...)
 

Miranda Kurucz

Ridin' The Range
Joined
Nov 19, 2016
Messages
58
Reaction score
62
Points
73
Location
Kitimat, British Columbia
Yikes. Why so far? I live in a rural spot too but the farthest I have gone for a goat is 2 hours. What state are you in?

Make sure they have water and hay. Not sure what else but wow that's a long trip!

Unfortunately the highway goes much of the way East -- and then all the way Northwest. We have to bypass the coastal mountains.
13394e3a-c3ff-417d-877a-3ffe27b7bbd3
90jOv9Y.jpg
 

Miranda Kurucz

Ridin' The Range
Joined
Nov 19, 2016
Messages
58
Reaction score
62
Points
73
Location
Kitimat, British Columbia
I wouldn't recommend carrying a goat kid in your lap for 16 hours... unless you are wearing rubber pants and the car seat is moisture proofed... Many transport them in a pet carryall/cage/crate... They're going to be pretty small and 2 of them should pretty easily fit in a large dog crate. Put some hay in there with them and they should transport just fine.

That coop looks familiar to me... Didn't you post pictures while rehabbing it over on BYC? I think I recall you posting pictures with coyotes in the background and talking about bears. My memory isn't what it once was, but if so, aren't you in Canada someplace? Regardless, glad you're here! As for too many pics? BWAHHAHAhahaha.... Nevah Happen! :D =D (Although some of us get a bit crotchety when folks quote posts with a lot of pictures in them and leave all the pictures there so we get to scroll through them multiple times to get to the actual post...)
Hahahah VERY good memory!! Yea I did a big post on my clean up -- I took in a lot of good advice and added a bunch of vents etc since then. I seriously love these online communities -- they are SO helpful.

They will be crated! I figured they'd feel more secure in a plastic crate as it can kind of hole them up. Okay so I may try and snuggle them for a few of the stretches.. but that's it!! I promise :celebrate
 

Bruce

Herd Master
Joined
Feb 4, 2016
Messages
15,024
Reaction score
37,577
Points
753
Location
NW Vermont
My drive home with the goats is 16 hours in one day! We live in a rural spot... So we will have a few stops for leg stretches etc. That was going to be my next post: long transportation on young kids. Any recommendations?

We found that the play places at McDonalds and Burger King made the kids happy. Different kinds of kids though :)
 

NH homesteader

Herd Master
Joined
Jul 9, 2016
Messages
3,815
Reaction score
3,848
Points
353
Location
New Hampshire
Haha! I told my husband someone said they were driving 16 hours to get some goats and he said "what, do they live in BC or something?" that's funny. They will be less stressed being together. When you get them home and settled, you should have a fecal sample checked by a vet if possible. The stress of moving can cause a parasite bloom. You'll hear all about it if you read up on here before getting them.

If you want to learn all about the "exciting" world of parasites (lol) go to the articles and read the ones by @Southern by choice. You will be ahead of the game if you do it now!
 

Miranda Kurucz

Ridin' The Range
Joined
Nov 19, 2016
Messages
58
Reaction score
62
Points
73
Location
Kitimat, British Columbia
I put reservations on 2 wethers with a breeder --- the babes come registration papers, disbudded, de-wormed, vaccinated, and tattooed. Herd is tested annually for CAE, Johne's and free of CL abscesses. Farm is registered with the Canadian Goat Society.

I really wanted to make sure we went with goats that were from healthy lines and a farm that will readily take calls/emails etc and help with information along the way.

A goat is a goat -- but we wanted to start off with something that helps us get used to goat quirks. Dave has had goats in the past but he's a little more old school Portuguese let's figure this out as we go and I'm a little more spoil and love.. and let's figure everything out and by the book it--- get a good line to start so we can have support and a little bit of background on the health of the babes!

We were able to pick a breeding pair to get our names on the reservation list but we were happy to take any kids that the breeder feels would be best for a hobby farm / pet type lifestyle. So if Little Hazelnut here has a boy that will be our first goat boy. As she is on the smaller side she is a good candidate to have boys wethered. Our second boy may be from her if she has 2 or, but like I said -- any boy that the breeder says will be a good fit I am happy to have.

Are you ready for pictures?!

SIvl9N8.jpg
e68e72e7-3ac1-42e7-a4db-3ad7332f94a6
d4XwWGL.jpg


2GTrqda.jpg


Her as a doeling
MtEhhUS.jpg


She was bred to Mister Hennessey
kTz3Knw.jpg


His background:
YVOJz0o.jpg


Their kids from last years kidding season:
tSasHfe.jpg

KmgqWoQ.jpg

VFx85zh.jpg

J6fPdlE.jpg

Bq5abUL.jpg

4HQqG48.jpg

89EyOOr.jpg
 

Southern by choice

Herd Master
Joined
Jun 11, 2012
Messages
13,336
Reaction score
14,639
Points
613
Location
North Carolina
I would try not to get in/out of the vehicle at all if possible on the trip home. More stress. The shavings will catch the urine and droppings. This is a baby goat, better to just travel straight.

I prefer on baby goats this- a harness. We use thes on all our baby kid goats. Less issues, no trachea damage. It allows freedom when walking until they get use to a collar. We DO NOT leave the harness on them. Just when we are walking them in an area that is not secured.

We do put flat puppy collars on our baby goats that stay on. It gets them use to it until you are ready for lead training.
Here is a pic of a kid a few weeks old.
3-7-13 008.jpg
 
Top