1. BYH Official Poll: What are the things that you should consider before buying herds?
    CLICK HERE!
    (if you are logged in, this notice can be dismissed using the "x" to the top right of the notice)

    Dismiss Notice
  2. Threads - What Do I need to know?
    CLICK HERE!
    (if you are logged in, this notice can be dismissed using the "x" to the top right of the notice)

    Dismiss Notice
  3. Dismiss Notice
  4. BYH Picture of the Week (POW) - Submit your Pics Now !!
    Click HERE!
    (if you are logged in, this notice can be dismissed using the "x" to the top right of the notice)
    Dismiss Notice

Germinating Okra Seeds (floating vs. sinking)

Discussion in 'Hobbies' started by Mike CHS, May 5, 2017.

  1. May 5, 2017
    Mike CHS

    Mike CHS Herd Master

    Joined:
    Mar 18, 2013
    Messages:
    3,973
    Likes Received:
    7,352
    Trophy Points:
    453
    Location:
    Southern Middle TN
    I wasn't sure where to post this or if anyone was even interested but we did a very unscientific experiment germinating some okra seeds. I had read several discussions on the web about testing for viability and the answers were all over the place.

    In this case the seed I was germinating was some of our saved Clemson Spineless Okra seed from last season. I soak the hard seeds in water for an hour or so and quite a few of the seeds will float on the surface and a good number will sink. We then placed a number of each in a damp paper towel and put them in a sandwich bag.

    I put 20 seeds each of the floating and sinking seeds and labeled them May 1st. I put them in potting soil in a flat since they had sprouts almost an inch long today.

    The result of our little test = Of the 20 sinker seeds tested, 19 had sizeable sprouts and the 20th looked like it was ready to sprout.

    Of the 20 floaters tested - 14 of the 20 seeds sprouted and the sprouts were considerably smaller (not sure if that matters in the long run).

    We do this with all of our early seeds that need hot weather to germinate and gain as much as 3 weeks or more on the growing season. Like our okra, I would not even consider putting seed in the ground until the soil temp was at or above 70 degress but seeing as it's in the 40's, they would just sit there until it gets warmer and possibly may not germinate at all with this weather.
     
    RollingAcres likes this.
  2. Aug 4, 2017
    RollingAcres

    RollingAcres Loving the herd life

    Joined:
    Jun 27, 2017
    Messages:
    315
    Likes Received:
    414
    Trophy Points:
    153
    Location:
    Capital Region NY
    Interesting experiment! Now that it's August, how are the okra plants doing? As you mentioned above that the floaters sprouts were considerable smaller, did that make a difference once they were planted? Just curious....
     
  3. Aug 4, 2017
    Mike CHS

    Mike CHS Herd Master

    Joined:
    Mar 18, 2013
    Messages:
    3,973
    Likes Received:
    7,352
    Trophy Points:
    453
    Location:
    Southern Middle TN
    We only have about a dozen plants in one raised bed but have put up enough for the winter. I have trimmed them all back some and they are giving a bunch of pods again. I thought I messed up for awhile since I planted watermelon in the same bed. It cooled off for a bit and I was afraid the melons would be a problem but they are doing fine.

    We only planted the ones that sunk so didn't get a comparison. I would have but okra only gets a limited space.
     
    RollingAcres likes this.
  4. Aug 4, 2017
    RollingAcres

    RollingAcres Loving the herd life

    Joined:
    Jun 27, 2017
    Messages:
    315
    Likes Received:
    414
    Trophy Points:
    153
    Location:
    Capital Region NY
    I've never planted okra before. Not sure how it will do in the northeast but maybe next year I'll give it a try.
     
  5. Aug 4, 2017
    Mike CHS

    Mike CHS Herd Master

    Joined:
    Mar 18, 2013
    Messages:
    3,973
    Likes Received:
    7,352
    Trophy Points:
    453
    Location:
    Southern Middle TN
    It is pretty much bullet proof around here. I grew it in Virginia but that's as far north as I have lived. It loves hot weather and thrives even in mild drought.
     
  6. Aug 4, 2017
    RollingAcres

    RollingAcres Loving the herd life

    Joined:
    Jun 27, 2017
    Messages:
    315
    Likes Received:
    414
    Trophy Points:
    153
    Location:
    Capital Region NY
    What's the maturity days for okra? It gets hot up here but it's always hit and miss. Some years it's cooler than normal and wet. This year has been hot but wet. So far my jalapenos are doing good, so might be ok for okra. Watch the year when I decide to plant okra it will be a cold and wet summer.:hu
     
  7. Aug 4, 2017
    Mike CHS

    Mike CHS Herd Master

    Joined:
    Mar 18, 2013
    Messages:
    3,973
    Likes Received:
    7,352
    Trophy Points:
    453
    Location:
    Southern Middle TN
    I grow Clemson Spineless and it takes ours about 45 days from planting to getting some to eat if you start like I do. If you plant in the ground it's a little over 2 months to maturity s long as the ground is warm when you plant.