Getting goats from Rescue

heidil

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Hello all. When my husband and I decided we were ready to get goats, we spoke to a few breeders but then I decided to reach out to a local rescue organization and they put me in touch with a woman looking to rehome her goats.

We have a 3-acre pasture that we will put them in with plenty of trees, shrubs and grapevine for them to nibble on to their heart's content. We don't have an LGD, so we setup a secure pen for them for night time to make sure they are safe from coyotes, bobcat, etc.

Since they have been at one farm their whole lives (2-years old) and are coming to our farm, I'm wondering what you recommend. Should they be placed in their secure pen for a few days so they recognize that as their "home" or "sleeping quarters" before we put them out to pasture?

Any other recommendations for making their transition as smooth as it can be? I know something like a rehoming can be stressful on them and stress can lead to illness. So, I want to alleviate as much stress as I can.
 
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Childwanderer

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I don’t have much goat experience, but I think you might get more replies to this post if you changed the title. “Rehoming Goats” sounds like you are looking for someone to take your goats of your hands rather than give advice for adjusting them to their nice new home!
 

heidil

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I don’t have much goat experience, but I think you might get more replies to this post if you changed the title. “Rehoming Goats” sounds like you are looking for someone to take your goats of your hands rather than give advice for adjusting them to their nice new home!
Thanks. I can see how people might think that was what I meant from the title. I changed it to something that hopefully won't scare 'em off. :)
 

OneFineAcre

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Yes, the transition can be stressful. I don't know that securing them in the pen will make that much difference in that regard. Place their food and water in the pen and try to spend some time with them.
 

BarnOwl

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Hi, have you brought home your new goats yet? I am only one week into owning goats, but I just brought home three young doelings. They were dam-raised and I didn't know how tame or used to people they would be so I built a 30 ft x 30 ft temporary pen out of cattle panels (lined w/chicken wire b/c my goats are small enough to slip through the grid). I'm going to move them out to the field really soon, but I am really glad we made our little pen. I feel like it made things easier--for me if not for them. Our doelings turned out to be really tame after I fed them a few times, but it's still nice to be able to monitor their stools and keep a close eye on them for a little while. The vet told me not to take down the little "temporary" pen. She said it'd be useful to contain them for her visits and in case we ever needed a quarantine area.

I got some tubes of probiotic and electrolyte paste recommended by the breeder and gave it to them for the first week or so.
 

heidil

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Hi, have you brought home your new goats yet? I am only one week into owning goats, but I just brought home three young doelings. They were dam-raised and I didn't know how tame or used to people they would be so I built a 30 ft x 30 ft temporary pen out of cattle panels (lined w/chicken wire b/c my goats are small enough to slip through the grid). I'm going to move them out to the field really soon, but I am really glad we made our little pen. I feel like it made things easier--for me if not for them. Our doelings turned out to be really tame after I fed them a few times, but it's still nice to be able to monitor their stools and keep a close eye on them for a little while. The vet told me not to take down the little "temporary" pen. She said it'd be useful to contain them for her visits and in case we ever needed a quarantine area.

I got some tubes of probiotic and electrolyte paste recommended by the breeder and gave it to them for the first week or so.
Yes, we brought ours home. One is as friendly as a dog... follows us and likes to be pet. The other is more cautious and prefers to stand a few feet away. They are doing really well though. I kept them in their pen for 2 days. Now they are let out to pasture during the day and they put themselves in their pen each night.

I hope you're enjoying yours too!
 
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