Goat Emergency - Fine to Can't Stand Overnight

HomesteaderWife

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@Alaskan - thank you for your kind words. And yes, I am going to ask if I hear back from them also. Because of the short time we had them and the way our other goat has not had issues, I am fairly certain it was something she had terribly when we bought her and the dewormer we gave was not broad enough to cover. I will ask though.

This is what we learn I guess for going to a poor quality auction instead of buying from a responsible farm with caring individuals. A rough lesson but we are glad to have had her nonetheless. Our other baby will be by herself for a little while, but not 100% - when we bring her in during the cold, our dog will be crated beside her at night. They've met a few times but usually she smells her then tries to headbutt her and the pup runs away (polled), even though our sweet Heeler just really wants to be friends with her. We will be searching for a good farm to get her a companion from, who tends their goats and their health. After checkup and quarantine, then they'll be introduced.
 

Alaskan

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@Alaskan - thank you for your kind words. And yes, I am going to ask if I hear back from them also. Because of the short time we had them and the way our other goat has not had issues, I am fairly certain it was something she had terribly when we bought her and the dewormer we gave was not broad enough to cover. I will ask though.

This is what we learn I guess for going to a poor quality auction instead of buying from a responsible farm with caring individuals. A rough lesson but we are glad to have had her nonetheless. Our other baby will be by herself for a little while, but not 100% - when we bring her in during the cold, our dog will be crated beside her at night. They've met a few times but usually she smells her then tries to headbutt her and the pup runs away (polled), even though our sweet Heeler just really wants to be friends with her. We will be searching for a good farm to get her a companion from, who tends their goats and their health. After checkup and quarantine, then they'll be introduced.
Sounds like a good plan.

:hugs

Be kind on yourself.

I am very "livestock" and not "pets" but goats are incredibly hard to lose emotionally.

Another reason to have a list of the specific worms, is that different worms need different meds. Also, they all have different life cycles. So... it is way easier to deal with, if you know exactly what you are dealing with.
 

farmerjan

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Sorry for the loss. There is no way to not get attached... and this from a person that doesn't especially like goats, but they do have personalities. Unfortunately it sounds like she was just too far gone when she collapsed and you took her to the vet. It happens. And yes, you learned about auctions and such. Not all animals that go through are neglected or mistreated or anything... she could have come from someone who just didn't know enough to take care of them right either.
We sell alot of our feeder calves at auction and we try to take good care of our animals. But there are some that just have problems that may not be noticed either.
I hope the vet can give you some closure on her and yes, the other one should be rechecked and wormed again.... some are naturally more resistant, but if they came from the same place, they could both have a high load and it can affect some worse than others.
 

HomesteaderWife

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@farmerjan - Thank you for making the point though that yes, not all auction animals are uncared for. And that there are those who do not know enough, as I myself am still learning. I simply meant that the conditions of the place and handling and the way some of the other goats that were with her group looked, I should've been more aware and expectant.
 

farmerjan

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Sorry you had to learn the hard way... And emotions get in the way for people... even experienced buyers... when a "cute" animal comes in the ring.... Not everyone is a good animal husbander.... in any type of animals. You gave her a chance, that counts for something.
 

Legamin

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Still... good to know.

It would be good if the vet could tell you exactly why she passed....

As in... exactly which worms, as well as how high a load?

If you know the exact worms you are dealing with, then it will be easier to manage.

:hugs

And YES, of course you are teary. It is incredibly sad to lose a goat! Goats have huge personality.
I found that was the most difficult thing with our goats, when we made the change to sheep, they had such individual personalities! We determined not to name them when we got them and then one bit my wife in the fanny…”Bitey”…he never gave the habit up! Another was just…off…sweet as candy and always needing love but willing to let everyone know that he was in full command of the yard…yet he wasn’t really..”Silly Boy”…the one other I recall remained nameless for ages until a large truck used it jake brake on the level road in front of the farm..he jumped four feet in the air and when he landed he went right back up…thought he had super springs!…
”Scairdie”. Every time we decided not to get attached they would pull a peculiarity out of thin air and surprise us with it! they are far more affectionate than sheep but in the end, at my age, sheep are more compliant. But loving goats is easy!
 
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