Goat with fractured leg.

Status
Not open for further replies.

GrassFarmerGalloway

Melts for all babies
Joined
Feb 15, 2009
Messages
860
Reaction score
1
Points
94
Location
New Hampshire
At least, that's what I think happened. She got it trying to jump the fence, and I walked out to find Millie running around the barn, not putting any weight on her leg. Localized swelling and tenderness and not putting any weight on it whatsoever, she will not tolerate me even brushing her leg. My dad doesn't think it's fractured. What do you think?
 

helmstead

Goat Mistress
Joined
May 18, 2009
Messages
3,012
Reaction score
6
Points
156
Location
Alfordsville, IN
I think an xray is in her future.

I have had a couple take a bad jump and go three-legged-lame, and found no fractures on xray - but it's always worth the vet visit to know for sure. A simple soft tissue injury will heal within a week...but an uncorrected fracture can cripple the animal for life.
 

FarmerChick

Overrun with beasties
Joined
Aug 5, 2009
Messages
337
Reaction score
0
Points
84
Location
North Carolina
Is this a pet?

I don't have pets. I don't do x-rays with a vet.

Hurt where--foot, leg, shoulder? Swelling where?


I would put her in a stall for a few days. Watch progress. Take it from there. I had a goat on 3 legs. She did well for many years.

So make her comfortable, if worried talk to your dad about a vet visit.
 

dragonlaurel

Chillin' with the herd
Joined
Jul 30, 2009
Messages
23
Reaction score
0
Points
27
Location
Arkansas
How long has it been? Does she still seem normal but just staying off that leg? Does it only seem to hurt when touched or used- or pretty constantly? Keep an eye out for signs of fever too.

Hope it's not broken, but that sounds like it should be checked out. Good luck. Hope your girl is healed up quick.
 

ksalvagno

Alpaca Master
Joined
Jun 1, 2009
Messages
7,899
Reaction score
43
Points
263
Location
North Central Ohio
I would at least get an anti-inflammatory in the goat like Banamine. See if she starts using it after that. The vet is certainly an option too.
 

helmstead

Goat Mistress
Joined
May 18, 2009
Messages
3,012
Reaction score
6
Points
156
Location
Alfordsville, IN
FarmerChick said:
Is this a pet?

I don't have pets. I don't do x-rays with a vet.
Ya know...I have production animals, show animals, some are pets some are not - my goats are a business and yet still, they see the vet when they need to. Production animals still need vet care when they're injured, even if to do nothing more than determine there's nothing more you can do.

Sometimes you make money, sometimes you loose it. To me, it's money wisely spent for peace of mind. :old
 

kimmyh

Overrun with beasties
Joined
Sep 1, 2009
Messages
335
Reaction score
0
Points
78
We can't really help you diagnose your goat based upon the information provided. With that said, I would call the vet and have him/her looked at if the limping did not improve in a few hours. While I was waiting for the vet, I would use a hose turned on low, and run it on the hurt area-as long as there is no open wound.

Production animal or not, if the animal is in my care I am responsible for its health and welfare. I would never allow an animal to suffer to save my pocket book this week, and then expect the animals to fill my wallet next week. Taking good care of our animals is a smart business practice because by the time a doe/buck reaches breeding age I have a lot of money in that animal, so why flush that investment down the drain for want of a little expense. Beyond that I have an emotional investment, in the health and well being of each animal on my farm. When the day comes that I don't care enough about them to pay a vet bill, it will be time to quit raising goats. But that's just me, not everyone thinks the same way.
 

lilhill

Loving the herd life
Joined
May 22, 2009
Messages
2,075
Reaction score
9
Points
134
Location
NW Alabama
kimmyh said:
Production animal or not, if the animal is in my care I am responsible for its health and welfare. I would never allow an animal to suffer to save my pocket book this week, and then expect the animals to fill my wallet next week. Taking good care of our animals is a smart business practice because by the time a doe/buck reaches breeding age I have a lot of money in that animal, so why flush that investment down the drain for want of a little expense. Beyond that I have an emotional investment, in the health and well being of each animal on my farm. When the day comes that I don't care enough about them to pay a vet bill, it will be time to quit raising goats. But that's just me, not everyone thinks the same way.
:thumbsup
 

FarmerChick

Overrun with beasties
Joined
Aug 5, 2009
Messages
337
Reaction score
0
Points
84
Location
North Carolina
I do as little vet intervention as needed.

I cull before I would call a vet for a broken leg....simple as that for me. That is the way I handle my animals.

I give them good care, they are on their worming schedules, etc. etc.

But I farm for income. I only give so much money into an animal and I am hard core on culling etc.

Some can not or do not prefer to do this, I do. Just me and the way I do things. No, not everyone wants to be hardcore culling and that is their option.

Everyone has their way of doing things that other posts have pointed out.

The day I have to start spending big money at the vet for livestock is the day I would quit farming animals.



Prevention is key to me. Routine care, good husbandry of the animal and mostly vet times can be avoided. If it comes to the vet or culling, I cull.
 
Status
Not open for further replies.

Latest posts

Top