Goats And donkeys together

Tennessee Farm girl

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Hello everyone. I’m excited about this forum since I am a newbie to farming. Definitely need some guidance. I have 2 new miniature donkeys and will be bringing home some young goats. I’m thinking that to keep things peaceful I would like to separate them during feeding. I have seen the creep feeders to keep donkeys out of goat feed, but how do you keep the goats out of the donkey feed so as not to anger the donkey. I have seen peaceful images and videos of everyone getting along together, but I have also heard stories of donkeys not being nice to goats especially during feeding time. Advice?
 

Mini Horses

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have seen peaceful images and videos of everyone getting along together, but I have also heard stories of donkeys not being nice to goats
True -- everything depends on the individual animal. A donkey can kill a goat very quickly and viciously. They can also be unconcerned with them. Goats can get along and can be annoying. It's the nature of both animals. :idunno


I will give you some thoughts. One, do not put them all together at once. They need to introduce to one another first. This is always best for any and all meetings, with supervision and several short, then longer visits and/or on a fenceline.

What are the ages and sex of the donks? Have they been around other animals? Ages, sex & breed of goats? Much of the suggestions will depend on these factors. If any are males, are they intact?

Then, you talk about "feeding time". Both of these animal types are NOT designed for a lot of grain. They are both foragers. So, minimal grains but 24/7 hay or pasture is the best. In nature, both of these are designed to browse the "less than high quality" grasses and forbs. Neither goats nor donkeys should be overweight.

The exception to more weight would be a true meat goat and the exception to more grains would be a heavy milking doe. These are situations that are beyond the everyday pasture animal...a specialty animal. These breeds are developed to do their "job" and the nutrition is far more intense than your ones with less demands.

I have had mini donks that would not bother anything, others would kill a rabbit, cat, whatever. I have EVEN had one who was pastured with a herd of goats and killed a young one that had slipped under a fence from an adjacent pasture! It wasn't HER goat and therefore, a predator/intruder. The protection drive is there. Although most of my mini donks were pretty docile with those they "knew" in their field but, a fox, possum, skunk...it was in big trouble.

So, while you can have a harmonious group, it must be developed and watched. I will say that IF the donkeys are quite young, like recently weaned, and the goats are several months old, you will more than likely have an easier time of blending them. Kids will often play well with other kids. :)

There are other donkey & goat owners. It ma take a day or so for response. Many of us work and don't get to the computer until evenings. Hang tight, more will come on & give great input.

By the way, welcome to BYH! Where pictures are anticipated....:D =D …. and we are all friendly to one another. Much knowledge and support here.
 
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Tennessee Farm girl

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T
True -- everything depends on the individual animal. A donkey can kill a goat very quickly and viciously. They can also be unconcerned with them. Goats can get along and can be annoying. It's the nature of both animals. :idunno


I will give you some thoughts. One, do not put them all together at once. They need to introduce to one another first. This is always best for any and all meetings, with supervision and several short, then longer visits and/or on a fenceline.

What are the ages and sex of the donks? Have they been around other animals? Ages, sex & breed of goats? Much of the suggestions will depend on these factors. If any are males, are they intact?

Then, you talk about "feeding time". Both of these animal types are NOT designed for a lot of grain. They are both foragers. So, minimal grains but 24/7 hay or pasture is the best. In nature, both of these are designed to browse the "less than high quality" grasses and forbs. Neither goats nor donkeys should be overweight.

The exception to more weight would be a true meat goat and the exception to more grains would be a heavy milking doe. These are situations that are beyond the everyday pasture animal...a specialty animal. These breeds are developed to do their "job" and the nutrition is far more intense than your ones with less demands.

I have had mini donks that would not bother anything, others would kill a rabbit, cat, whatever. I have EVEN had one who was pastured with a herd of goats and killed a young one that had slipped under a fence from an adjacent pasture! It wasn't HER goat and therefore, a predator/intruder. The protection drive is there. Although most of my mini donks were pretty docile with those they "knew" in their field but, a fox, possum, skunk...it was in big trouble.

So, while you can have a harmonious group, it must be developed and watched. I will say that IF the donkeys are quite young, like recently weaned, and the goats are several months old, you will more than likely have an easier time of blending them. Kids will often play well with other kids. :)

There are other donkey & goat owners. It ma take a day or so for response. Many of us work and don't get to the computer until evenings. Hang tight, more will come on & give great input.

By the way, welcome to BYH! Where pictures are anticipated....:D =D …. and we are all friendly to one another. Much knowledge and support here.[/QUOTE
Thank you so much. I appreciate the feedback! The donkeys are fairly young males....14 months and 6 months. They will be gelded as soon as the weather cools off. The goats are young too. I’m keeping my fingers crossed!
 

Tennessee Farm girl

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Everything that @Mini Horses said! I had a mini jack who picked up a doe and tossed her through the air then tried to stomp her to death with his front feet. He got gelded the next day. But even months later he hadn't settled down. My suggestion is to just be very, very careful!
Thank you for your reply. Yikes! That’s a scary story. I’m hoping for the best, obviously. I’ll go slow with their introduction and keep my fingers crossed!
 

Baymule

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You have been warned about the unpredictable behavior of donkeys. I will advise separate pens or pastures.

Options; pens can be thrown up quickly with panels and T-posts. Gates are half a panel, attached with hog rings and closed with clips. They are 16 feet long. Sheep and goat panels have 4 inch holes and do a good job of containing them.

https://www.tractorsupply.com/tsc/product/feedlot-panel-sheep-goat-16-ft-l-x-48-in-h?solr=1&cm_vc=-10005

Cow panels are cheaper, but baby kids can walk right through them. If the donkeys consider them an intruder, it could end badly. The cow panels have 6 inch holes.

https://www.tractorsupply.com/tsc/product/feedlot-panel-cattle-16-ft-l-x-50-in-h?cm_vc=IOPDP1

Or you can buy a roll of sheep and goat wire to make pens. It comes in 330' rolls or 100' rolls.

https://www.tractorsupply.com/tsc/product/red-brand-goat-fence-48-in-x-330-ft?cm_vc=-10005

Myself, I use cow panels for lots of things. I can put up a pen, decide I don't like it, move it, reconfigure it, it goes up and comes down in a snap, They are useful for many things. We even build temporary loading chutes with them.
 

AmberLops

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I don't have any advice for the donkey/goat issue...but everyone else gave you great advice!
Just wanted to say hello and welcome to BYH! :frow:welcome
 

Tennessee Farm girl

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You have been warned about the unpredictable behavior of donkeys. I will advise separate pens or pastures.

Options; pens can be thrown up quickly with panels and T-posts. Gates are half a panel, attached with hog rings and closed with clips. They are 16 feet long. Sheep and goat panels have 4 inch holes and do a good job of containing them.

https://www.tractorsupply.com/tsc/product/feedlot-panel-sheep-goat-16-ft-l-x-48-in-h?solr=1&cm_vc=-10005

Cow panels are cheaper, but baby kids can walk right through them. If the donkeys consider them an intruder, it could end badly. The cow panels have 6 inch holes.

https://www.tractorsupply.com/tsc/product/feedlot-panel-cattle-16-ft-l-x-50-in-h?cm_vc=IOPDP1

Or you can buy a roll of sheep and goat wire to make pens. It comes in 330' rolls or 100' rolls.

https://www.tractorsupply.com/tsc/product/red-brand-goat-fence-48-in-x-330-ft?cm_vc=-10005

Myself, I use cow panels for lots of things. I can put up a pen, decide I don't like it, move it, reconfigure it, it goes up and comes down in a snap, They are useful for many things. We even build temporary loading chutes with them.
Thank you! That’s great advice.
We
I don't have any advice for the donkey/goat issue...but everyone else gave you great advice!
Just wanted to say hello and welcome to BYH! :frow:welcome
 
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