Had some (store bought) lamb

secuono

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Bought some lamb chops. DH and I cooked it, took forever to get the right temperature, little burnt, but not bad.

DH has had other lamb from restaurants and didn't like them.

What we managed to cook didn't have much taste, to me, I approve, lol. I've heard stories all over the place on taste and I'm crazy picky.

It was more tender than any steak DH has had, too. Wasn't chewy or funky either.

So will for sure be keeping a lamb for the table next year!

DH talked about finding a butcher to do it properly, so I guess I need to find a local or convince him to get over it, since it is Expensive! Kill fee alone costs as much as buying a fall lamb on CL.

The lamb from this year, he ended up friendly and found a great pet home.

Sorry, I cut it up before remembering to take a picture.
IMG_1511053216044.jpg
 

Baymule

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Definitely keep one for the freezer! We love lamb! here it is $95 to get one processed, including kill fee. I haven't processed one myself........ I can process chickens, ducks and hogs. But those cute little lamby faces, well, we just load them up and take them to be processed.
 

secuono

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100-125 kill fee alone... =/
Hopefully, Tatiana has a ram to put in the freezer.

Also saw a 2# rabbit, $31 plus tax....wow. you can get 6+# live rabbits for $15.
 

Baymule

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We have 2 hogs at the processor now......$50 each kill fee and $1.05 per pound, hanging weight, to cut and wrap. This place doesn't cure ham or bacon.
 

Latestarter

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There are plenty of butchering videos available on you tube... just sayin. It's not too difficult, but you need a few tools... knives, bone saw, area to do the butchering...

sorry, ETA: I love lamb... chops, leg of, etc. I don't typically use mint with mine though most traditional recipes call for it. I find the mint overpowering. And I especially love the gravy the drippings make... :drool:drool:love:bow
 

DesertDawn

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I love the flavor of lamb. In fact, we're currently in our research stage of breed types to start a small herd. One thing I've learned recently about the flavor, it's mostly in the fat so fattier cuts will have a gamier flavor than leaner cuts so how you prepare and cook will have a lot to do with taste.
 

Sara Ranch

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@DesertDawn - please share your findings with us! Or pm me that info.

Sheep are on the ranch wish list. I've started a little (and I do mean - little) amount of research already. I enjoy learning what others find important, or not important. :)
 

Baymule

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We have hair sheep, Dorper/Katahdin cross. Their meat isn't gamy at all. We took a 3 year old ram to slaughter and couldn't tell the difference between him and 10 month old lamb. Plus I don't have to shear or crutch.
 

DesertDawn

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I really want Dorper sheep. For me, I love that they shed their wool, they're hornless, and they have a shorter coat. We live in SE Arizona so they need to be adaptable to this climate. I've also read, like what Baymule stated, their meat is mild tasting. Baymule that's great to know that the older sheep are just as mild. I've also read that their skin is very sought after. The other breed I am looking at is Navajo Churro. I like that they have survived in this area for a long time and thrive here. They're also very disease resistant. We purchased a Churro roast from the Farmer's Market and we loved the taste. Their wool is used in Indian blankets but I have to sheer which I'm not sure I want to deal with annually.
 
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