Hanging Weight

OneFineAcre

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If you had an 1100 lb Angus steer the hanging weight would be 62% from what I understand so about 682 lbs
When it is deboned and packaged about how much meat would that translate to?
I'm thinking 500 lbs maybe ?
 
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OneFineAcre

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I think de-boned you're looking at about 50% of hanging weight. @farmerjan would know as would @greybeard I expect.

I don't think that's right
To be sure you'd get more than 340 lbs of meat
Of course the bone would still be in TBones and Rib steaks

ETA
Of course I could be wrong
I don't know that's why I asked :)
 

farmerjan

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The rule of thumb, by our butcher, is; live weight =50% hanging weight=50% edible packaged meat. So that is approx 1/4 of the live weight. That is the low side as many will hang at 60%. 62% is what the USDA charts say. Do you believe what the gov't tells you????:hu:hu. The angus assoc also has the 62% rule, but it doesn't always happen.
I had a jersey steer that weighed 1100+ lbs. Hung at 790 lbs. (72%) and got about 350 lbs edible meat. They are more lean and I was very pleased with what it figured out as. Always figure 50% of the hanging weight as the "take home" meat. There is deboning and alot of trim of fat and non-usable sinews etc. So regardless of the live weight, figure 50% of the hanging weight. It also will depend on what the animal has been eating, as to the ratio of fat on the carcass, and the frame of the animal as to the finish on the carcass also.
If you are taking it to be done and this is the first time couple of things; LOOK at a chart of where the different cuts come from and ASK questions; the thicker the steaks the fewer you will get, so many people tend to forget that; T-bones can only be done on animals less than 27 months due to the BSE (mad cow) ruling with the backbone/spinal cord contamination stuff; don't bother with t-bones as the bone takes up alot of room, get filet and N.Y. strips instead. Sirloins are good steaks especially if the animal is marbled . If you like much stew meat and want to get as much as you can, tell them that you do stir fry and you want them to throw the smaller pieces from trimming into the stew meat instead of the ground beef. If the animal is less than the 27 months, get the backbone cut up to use as barbeque "ribs". There is alot of odd pieces of meat on them and they cook into great BBQ pieces. Get all the bones you can if you have dogs. Some will be soup bones and will have some meat on them for making beef broth/soup. If you make soap, or have venison, get all the fat back. It will taste better in the venison for hamburger and it can be rendered into "shortening", or used to feed the birds (suet), or used for soap making (tallow).
Get all the odd stuff back, "ox-tail", tongue, liver, etc. and find recipes to at least try it once. It will still be good for the dogs/cats if you don't like it.
If you are not big on roasts only get a few and do things like cube steaks.
Approx 1/4 to 1/3 of the meat will be in hamburger. There are alot of scraps and they will put it into burger. Get it lean and don't overcook them.
You will not believe the flavor of real meat, especially if it is not overfed feedlot type beef.:drool:drool
 
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OneFineAcre

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So here is the deal
My wife's dad is 88 years old and he is having some issues as would be expected
He's been doing cows for 60 years
At one point this summer he had 90
Cows and calves
He's down to 45 or so now and after the first of the year we are going to sell all but 10 heifers and a few of the older cows
Immediate situation
We don't do grass fed beef
Her dad feed lots his steers for 90 days prior to slaughter
He can't do it too much work and has to haul water
He's going to bring 2 of them here next week
They are 18 months old and weigh around 800-900 lbs
We feed them out
They get one and we get one
They pay their slaughter butcher and package and we pay ours
Slaughter butcher and vacuum package is $325
We were thinking it would cost $675 to feed them out
I talked to my hay/feed guy today and he says it's a winner
You are telling me less meat than anyone else is
 

Goat Whisperer

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You know me well :lol:

I was just wondering how the LGDs would do. Goats would probably be scared. :lol:

Send me pics when you have steers walking around your front yard :D

You putting up electric fence? Hard fence?

You can put that on your journal if you want. Not trying to hijack this thread :oops:
 

OneFineAcre

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You know me well :lol:

I was just wondering how the LGDs would do. Goats would probably be scared. :lol:

Send me pics when you have steers walking around your front yard :D

You putting up electric fence? Hard fence?

You can put that on your journal if you want. Not trying to hijack this thread :oops:
You've been here
It's the front field on the right when you come in our driveway
It's about an acre or so and its fenced in
I've got a strand of Hotwire about 18 inches
I may run another
Strand of hot wire up higher
We may get 2 feeder pigs to run with them
 

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