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Hay loft questions, windows/vents

Discussion in 'Pasture, Hay, & Forages: Information & Management' started by CrockpotGodess, Feb 26, 2018.

  1. Mar 23, 2018
    CrockpotGodess

    CrockpotGodess Chillin' with the herd

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    Contruction weekend commenced. All studs cut and ready to be framed in. Going to be cold but that is New England. I am so excited to get our little ladies!
     
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  2. Apr 12, 2018
    rbruno

    rbruno Exploring the pasture

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    I might be coming late to the party here, but from experience, you do not want to store hay on the second floor or loft. Not because it will go bad, but because you will grow very tired of throwing bales up to the loft. My first barn at my parents house was like that. Had a second floor where I stored hay. I made a promise to my self that I would always store hay on the first floor of any building I had before making a second story to throw hay. Now, if you have a lift or elevator to move the hay up there, that is totally different. Never had a problem with it going bad, just a pain to throw up there.
    My farmer that I get my hay always recommends stacking the hay on its side. He says it allows the air to move up through the bale through the stack no matter how high you stack it. I don't know the science behind it or if it actually works, but that is how I stack it.
    Rob
     
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  3. Apr 12, 2018
    Bruce

    Bruce Herd Master

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    My hay is stored one level above the level where it is used. But that is because the barn is on a hill so the hay gets delivered at ground level and I have to move it down to animal ground level ;) I take 3-4 bales down and stick them in an unused stall. Repeat when I have 1 or only a partial left down below.

    But I agree with you, I'm sure I wouldn't want to push hay bales "upstairs" by hand and then move it back down to use it.
     
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  4. Apr 13, 2018
    rbruno

    rbruno Exploring the pasture

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    That is a good point. If the barn is built into a bank like so many used to be, that would be great. Easier throwing it down then up right. My first barn was not. Even standing on the back of my pickup truck, I was throwing up. Learned a good lesson that helped with future barn designs.
     
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